Why is carl uncomfortable again this is where your

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Music for Ear Training
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 1
Music for Ear Training
Horvit/Koozin
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seen these behaviors before, but all in one sitting? Why is Carl uncomfortable? Again, this is where your baselining skills, empathy, and intuition must come into play. Sometimes the biggest clue that someone is being deceptive resides in clusters of behaviors that are not typically displayed concurrently. As we’ve noted, people intent on deception will pay meticulous attention to what they say—but unless they’ve had a chance to rehearse their story before, their bodies will unconsciously betray them. Generally, getting the words right in a lie requires so much mental energy that none is left for the liar to plan out his mannerisms as well. If you were to ask, “So how many years of college did you actually complete?” your companion might reply “Four” but hold up only three fingers. He’ll usually notice his mistake and correct it, maybe with an accompanying grin and a “Whoops!” Now, this could be an honest mistake. Then again, it’s been established that when there’s incongruity between verbal and nonverbal behavior, the nonverbal behavior is generally the more accurate. 1 Here’s a summary of the clusters to keep an eye out for: Nonverbal Clusters Grooming gestures Hand wringing Inward-curled feet Stiff upper body, inappropriate stillness Pursed lips or biting of the lips
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Music for Ear Training
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 1
Music for Ear Training
Horvit/Koozin
Expert Verified
Slumped or self-protective posture Moving objects around the table or floor Post-interview relief expression Excessive sweating, breathing, finger tapping Shift in blink rate Shrugs, clenched fists, winks, palms turned up out of sync with dialogue Fake smile Closed eyes Verbal Clusters Qualifying statements: “As far as I know…” “To tell you the truth…” Repeating your question verbatim Non-spontaneous response time Weak and apologetic tone of voice Dodging the question (For example: “I already told HR that.”) Inappropriate detail Short, clipped answers Religious references (“I swear on the Bible.”) Objections to irrelevant specifics (“No—I had the chicken, not the steak.”) Whining about the interview itself: “How much longer will this take?” Uncooperative or dismissive attitude More emphasis on persuading you than on the facts BASIC STEP #3 REVIEW: STUDY THE CLUSTERS Look for groups of suspicious verbal and nonverbal deceptive behaviors, especially ones that don’t usually go together. Step #4: Intuit the Gaps There are several types of gaps to watch for if you suspect that someone is deceiving you. Statement gaps reveal an incongruity between what someone says he was doing and what the
facts tell you. If Jake says he spent Monday through Wednesday in San Francisco entertaining clients, it’s not unreasonable to wonder why he doesn’t have a single credit card expense on record for Tuesday. That’s one kind of incongruity. Or perhaps there’s a mismatch between the story Jake tells you and the one you hear from his partner, Julia.

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