The brain makes this comparison based on the past

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symptoms of GAD. The brain makes this comparison based on the past encounters as well as knowledge through a process that cannot be manipulated or controlled by the conscious mind (Parnas, 2015). Common forthright cases prevail the daily practice, although the clinicians are also faced complex cases that do not fit previously known patterns. To make sense of such cases, the physicians utilize the more thoughtful and intense approach to analytic thinking or reasoning.
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NATHAN’S CASE ANALYSIS 4 The clinicians must search through knowledge and memory stores and regularly employ outside information sources to create a diagnosis. The clinician starts to develop a short list of possible diagnoses within a few seconds of the patient encounter. The number of these assumptions is narrowed down and verified to get the final diagnosis, which must be adequate and articulate ( Nurcombe, 1987) . The final diagnosis must explain most of the symptoms and follow patient's clinical course, presentation, and demographics ( Nurcombe, 1987) . Furthermore, there must be a rational match between the clinical presentation of the patient and the sample illness picture in their mind ( First, Reed, Hyman & Saxena, 2015). Discussion DSM-5 handbook of differential diagnosis is a unique controller for physicians and students learning psychiatric diagnosis. The manual provides a big selection of viewpoints, as well as a collection of methodologies to differential diagnosis, as well as numerous features meant to assist clinicians in the examination room (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Given the case of Nathan, we are going to use the manual to reach a diagnosis. The numerous features of the handbook such as the six-step outline will be handy. The six-step outline for diagnosing patients starts with finding out if the symptom is real and goes all the way to creating the margin between normality and disorder, with intermediate steps to rule out medical conditions and substance etiology. The outline also helps determine the primary condition and to segregate adjustment disorders from other mental conditions. The symptoms presented by Nathan could easily be confused with those of other conditions related to his diagnosis; therefore, a differential diagnosis needs to be made. DSM-5 provides exhaustive decision points to simplify the process of making the differential diagnosis using the presented symptoms and
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NATHAN’S CASE ANALYSIS 5 eradicate articulating rash decisions (American Psychiatric Association, & American Psychiatric Association. DSM-5 Task Force, 2013). Diagnosis The case history, as well as the symptoms presented by Nathan, points to a possible case of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). This condition is an anxiety condition described by the presence of excess, irrepressible and often unreasonable worry, that is, anxious anticipation about activities or events. This unwarranted anxiety often affects the daily functioning, as the persons with GAD characteristically forestall disaster, and are excessively concerned about day to day
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