Mental health issue become dominant and operating

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mental health issue become dominant and operating under the same mentality in the juvenile system can cause a misdiagnosis or lack of diagnosis all together here as well. As previously mentioned under trained or poorly equipped staff are often in a position that leaves them to interact with inmates or offenders that may be dealing with a mental illness. As a result of not being properly informed or equipped to deal with these situations their responses and treatment of these individuals could in fact cause further stress or injury. Inability to identify a mental health issue can often lead to individuals being labeled as difficult and potentially punished for reactions that may be beyond their control . The juvenile justice system relies on the assumptions that adolescents, by virtue of their developmental immaturity, are less culpable offenders and more amenable to treatment than their adult counterparts (Cruise, et al., 2008). Given this presumed ability to be molded, rehabilitation has a higher chance of effectiveness among the juvenile population. Despite this fact when compared to the general population, juvenile delinquents are exposed to less protective factors and higher risk. Since juvenile offenders are still developing judicial decision makers and mental health professionals have struggled to define specifically how youths’ cognitive and emotional capacities influence delinquent behavior and abilities as legal decision makers. This has caused inconsistent articulation of the legal relevance in Supreme Court cases and subsequent juvenile justice policy mandates (Cruise, et al., 2008). Recent studies have found that approximately two thirds (66.3%) of male youths and three quarters (73.8%) of female youths in the juvenile justice system have a diagnosable mental health disorder (Cruise, et al., 2008). It is important to also note that among these disorders is substance abuse. Over the course of a 7-year period, the 7
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CONTRIBUTING FACTORS TO DELINQUENCY AMONG JUVENILES Pathways to Desistance study found that adolescents with substance use disorders were more likely to continue to commit crimes and less likely to spend time in school or working. While there currently is no evidence that can directly correlate substance use leading to further delinquent behavior even though the use itself is a delinquent act. However, there is growing consensus that intervention and supervision strategies with justice involved youth must be guided by an understanding of the myriad factors that contribute to adolescent delinquent behavior (Cruise, et al., 2008). A study conducted by Kennedy, Edmonds, Millen, & Detullio, (2018), examined the relationship between commonly known risk factors and recidivism rates for youthful offenders. A sample consisting of 564 male and female offenders who were referred to the Juvenile Court Assessment Center by the Juvenile Division of the Miami-Dade County court were used in this study. Data from clinical interviews was collected as well as the results from the Wide Range Achievement Test were analyzed. A total of six factors were found to be significant on a
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  • Fall '19
  • delinquent behavior

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