2 Farm Raised Catfish US farm raised catfish are fed primarily corn and soy a

2 farm raised catfish us farm raised catfish are fed

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omega-3s and lowest levels of mercury and PCBs among salmon. 2. Farm-Raised Catfish - US farm-raised catfish are fed primarily corn and soy, a diet similar to cattle feed. Less feed is required to grow an American catfish than to grow an American cow. Cattle emit methane major greenhouse gases part of their digestive process, fish end up having a much smaller carbon footprint than cows, making fish a good choice of protein . 3. Sea Bass - These fish are near-shore dwellers, so they are often caught by small day-boat American fishermen and marketed directly to consumers through a new kind of seafood distribution system called a community-supported fishery, or CSF. Helps supports local fishermen has clear environmental and economic benefits, as well: Currently, about 90 percent of the seafood Americans eat is imported, traveling an average of nearly 5,5oo miles to reach our plates. 4. Sardines and Herring - Sardines on the West Coast and Atlantic herring on the East Coast are a much easier catch, and thus less burdensome on the environment. Require less than a tenth of the fuel to catch than bottom-trawled seafood like flounder and sole. Sardines and herring are also rich in omega-3s and low in environmental toxins. If we ask our local fishmongers to supply American-caught sardines and herring, the market will likely respond to our demands. 5. Farm Clams - Don’t require and fish as their feed. They grow plump and sweet by making the water a healthier place for fish to live. They eat the algae and remove it from the water before it can damage coastal ecosystems. Done in ocean waters, so it helps clean the environment while allowing the wild supply to be sustainable. 6. Farm Oysters - Don’t require and fish as their feed. They grow plump and sweet by making the water a healthier place for fish to live. They eat the algae and remove it from the water before it can damage coastal ecosystems. Done in
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  • Spring '08
  • GEORGE
  • Seafood, sustainable seafood, Seafood Sustainability

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