To improve skimming readers should read more and more

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To improve skimming, readers should read more and more rapidly, to form appropriate questions and predictions and then read quickly Pugh (1978) suggests that to assess skimming, after the students have read and completed the assigned questions, further questions may be asked, "beyond the scope of the purpose originally set" (p.70). If students can answer these questions correctly, it indicates they have read the text too closely. Research Questions Does the skill of skimming transfer from the first language to the second? Skimming Three Types of Skimming: 1 P r e - r ea d s k i mm i ng r e f e r s t o pr e pa r i ng t o r ea d. 2 Skim reading refers to situations in which skimming is the only coverage you plan to give the material. 3 Review skimming assumes you have already read the material and are going back over it as a means of study and review. How Do I Use Skimming? 1 Read the title. If it is an article, check the author, publication date, and source. 2 Read the introduction. If it is very long, read only the first paragraph completely. Then, read only the first sentence of every paragraph. That sentence will usually be the main idea of that paragraph. 3 Re a d a ny he a di ng s a nd s ub - he a di ng s . T he he a di ng s , w he n t a k e n t og e t he r , f or m a n out l i ne of t he m a i n t opi c s covered in the material. 4 Notice any pictures, charts, or graphs; they are usually included to emphasize important dates or concepts. 5 If you do not get enough information from the headings, or if you are working with material that does not have headings, read the first sentence of each paragraph. 6 Glance at the remainder of the paragraph. a Notice any italicized or boldface words or phrases. These are key terms. b. Look for lists of ideas within the text of the material. The author may use numerals, such as (1), (2), (3) in the list, or signal words such as first, second, one major cause, another cause, etc. 7 Read the summary or last paragraph. Scanning What is Scanning? Scanning is a method of selective reading, when searching for a particular fact or answer to a question. Scanning can best be described as a looking rather than a reading process. How Do I Use Scanning? 1 State in your mind specifically the information for which you are looking. Phrase it in question form, if possible. 2 Try to anticipate how the answer will appear and what clues you might use to help you locate the answer.
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3 Determine the organization of the material; it is your most important clue to where to begin looking for information. Especially when looking up information contained in charts and tables, the organization of the information is crucial to rapid scanning. 4 Use headings and any other aids that will help you identify which sections might contain the information for which you are looking.
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