Serfdom was abolished only in l861 yet the power of the landed nobility

Serfdom was abolished only in l861 yet the power of

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Serfdom was abolished only in l861 -yet the power of the landed nobility remained. Serfs remained tied to the land, even if ‘freed’ and now had to pay rent for the land. C. Ideas --some halting efforts to establish representative institutions, the rule of law . But Czars opposed to liberal ideas which threatened the absolutism of the rulers -yet even minimal liberalization before 1881 Led to relaxation of restrictions on the press, on travel, And leads to flood of Western ideas Tsar Alexander III (1881-1894) completely stopped even the cautious moves toward political liberalization ... ruled as an autocrat in the old style ... the autocracy thereafter determined to keep liberal ideas out of Russia, silence those who promoted them --liberalism kept alive only by Westernized intellectuals, and these totally alienated from and hostile to the regime --in sum, by the early 20 th century, Russia had a restive peasantry, a small but very rebellious proletariat, and a government committed to keeping things under control in the old, autocratic way, feeling no pressure from any proponents of liberalism to do otherwise ... dead set against liberalization but rushing full steam ahead with industrialization ... inevitable explosion, which would come in 1905, but before that ... 8 9 10 11 12
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1/31/2015 3 --in sum, by the early 20 th century, Russia had a restive peasantry, a small but very rebellious proletariat, and a government committed to keeping things under control in the old, autocratic way, feeling no pressure from any proponents of liberalism to do otherwise ... dead set against liberalization but rushing full steam ahead with industrialization ... inevitable explosion, which would come in 1905, but before that ... A. Populists --believed that capitalist industrialization had produced human degradation, impoverishment and therefore ought to be avoided ... advocated a socialist, or better communal, alternative geared what they understood to be the needs, situation of the Russia peasant ... -wanted to strengthen the communal landowning system that existed after the abolition of serfdom ... the revolution they saw on the horizon a movement by the peasants, and against Tsar and large landowners, to create an agrarian socialism out of these communal traditions in short, a socialism that skipped the capitalist stage altogether ... populist sentiment crystallized in 1901 in the founding of the Social Revolutionary party B. Marxists --beginning in the early 1880s, a number of Russian intellectuals, most of them former populists and many of them while in exile in Europe, adopted Marxism ... -believed the development of capitalism was a good thing, necessary to prepare the way for socialism ...
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