Their jobs are just as necessary as doctor and

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society would not function how it does. Their jobs are just as necessary as doctor and lawyers. 2. The film discussed the portrayal of African American men and women in the working class in three ways: their depiction only as servants in early years, the idea of them being brought out of the ghetto by middle class whites, and the fact that the struggle of the African Americans that have become successful are ignored. Early on, television tended to identify Caucasians with being middle class and African Americans as working class, showering them only in servant and petty roles on. They were also shown desiring things that middle class Caucasians had. For example, the “Amos n’ Andy” clip showed and African American woman’s desire for a new table because it would allow her to be more like those in a higher social class. She directly attributed to her material goods increasing her social class and becoming more like the white middle class. “Diff’rent Strokes” depicted the idea that African Americans need help in order to become part of the middle class. Similarly, “Fresh Prince” surrounds the idea that black youth must be taken out of the ghetto in order to survive. Although Will Smith moves in with his wealthy African American aunt and uncle, the idea of needing a savior is still present. Although not all television series show African Americans in the working class, the ones that depict a wealthy family ignore the struggles they may have gone through and also blur the fact that redistribution of wealth and power is necessary. People perceived the television shows as “real life” and began to believe that if African Americans can make their way out of the working class on TV then they are doing it in the real world as well. Television also tends to treat being African American and being part of the working class synonomously. Cop shows often focus on the working class, African Americans included, and give viewers the idea that black males should be feared. Class and race are two very different concepts, yet TV often fails to make the distinction
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