Providing Cessation Services Via Other Technologies Emerging technologies such

Providing cessation services via other technologies

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Providing Cessation Services Via Other Technologies Emerging technologies, such as text messaging, Web, and social media interventions, could poten- tially extend the reach and increase the impact of quitlines by complementing telephone cessation assistance with quitting motivation and support delivered through other modalities. 14 These inter- ventions are in some ways more convenient and readily accessible than quitlines and might engage young adult smokers, who may be especially likely to use these technologies and may prefer receiving cessation support through these famil- iar channels. 6,14 Budget recommendations for this component of the report are based on a fixed cost of $135,000 per state. Because these communica- tion channels may continue to evolve and expand over time, it is important for state tobacco con- trol programs to annually assess whether it may be cost-effective to increase this funding level to meet their goals.
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52 Section A: Cessation Interventions References 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs — 2007. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2007. 2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2000. 3. Institute of Medicine. Ending the Tobacco Problem: A Blueprint for the Nation. Washington: The National Academies Press, 2007. 4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Servic es, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004. 5. Jha P, Ramasundarahettige C, Landsman V, Rostron B, Thun M, Anderson RN, McAfee T, Peto R. 21st-century hazards of smoking and benefits of cessation in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine 2013;368(4):341–50. 6. The Guide to Community Preventive Services. Reducing tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure; < tobacco/index.html>; accessed: December 2, 2013. 7. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006.
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