reflection of Dickinsons thirsting starving persona an outward expression of

Reflection of dickinsons thirsting starving persona

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reflection of Dickinson's "thirsting-starving persona", an outward expression of her needy self-image as small, thin and frail.[137]Dickinson's most psychologically complex poems explore the theme that the loss of hunger for life causes the death of self and place this at "the interface of murder and suicide".[137]Gospel poems. Throughout her life, Dickinson wrote poems reflecting a preoccupation with the teachings of Jesus Christ and, indeed, many are addressed to him.[138]She stresses the Gospels' contemporary pertinence and recreates them, often with "wit and American colloquial language".[138]Scholar Dorothy Oberhaus finds that the "salient feature uniting Christian poets ... is their reverential attention to the life of Jesus Christ" and contends that Dickinson's deep structures place her in the "poetic tradition of Christian devotion" alongside Hopkins, Eliotand Auden.[138]In a Nativity poem, Dickinson combines lightness and wit to revisit an ancient theme: "The Savior must have been / A docile Gentleman – / To come so far so cold a Day / For little Fellowmen / The Road to Bethlehem / Since He and I were Boys / Was leveled, but for that twould be / A rugged billion Miles –".
Structure and syntaxDickinson's handwritten manuscript of her poem "Wild Nights – Wild Nights!"The extensive use of dashesand unconventional capitalizationin Dickinson's manuscripts, and the idiosyncraticvocabulary and imagery, combine to create a body of work that is "far more various in its styles and forms than is commonly supposed".[3][127]She did not write in traditional iambic pentameter(a convention of English-speaking poetry for centuries), and did not even use a five-footline. Her line lengths vary from four syllables or two feet to often eight syllables or four feet.[128]Her frequent use of approximate or slant rhymeattracted attention since her work first appeared in print.[128]Her poems typically begin with a declaration or definition in the first line ("The fact that Earth is Heaven"), which is followed by a metaphorical change of the original premise in the second line ("Whether Heaven is Heaven or not").[129]Dickinson's poems can easily be set to music because of the frequent use of rhyme and free verse. Written for the most part in common meteror ballad-meter, they can also be set to songs that use the same alternating lines of iambic tetrameterand iambictrimeter.

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