Polypectate RNA Starch Tweens Tyrosine Urea Xanthine Growth aton 4 5 C 30C 37C

Polypectate rna starch tweens tyrosine urea xanthine

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Polypectate RNA Starch Tweens Tyrosine Urea Xanthine Growth at/on: 4-5° C 30°C 37°C Cystine lactose electrolyte-deficient achromogenes + + + - - - - + ND ND + - - + - - - + + + ND - ND ND + ND + ND - - V + - Aer. salmonicida subsp masoucida pectinolytica - + + + - - + - + ND ND + + + - + + + + - - + ND + ND ND + ND + ND - - V + - + V + + + + - - + ND ND + ND - + V - V ND ND + + ND + ND ND ND ND - ND ND + + 1, salmonicida + V + + V - V - + - - + V - + - V + + - + + + + ND + + + + - - V + - smithia + - + + + - - - + - + + - - ND - - - + - + + - ND + + - ND ND + - - agar ND ND {continued)
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Bacterial Fish Pathogens Table 4.1 {cont.) Character Aer. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes masoucida pectinolytica salmonicida smithia Growth at/on (cont.): MacConkey agar Potassium cyanide TCBS agar 0-2% (w/v) NaCl 3% (w/v) NaCl 4% (w/v) NaCl V + - + V ND V ND ND ND ND + - + V - ND ND + - UtiHsation of sodium citrate Production of acid from: Adonitol Amygdalin Arabinose Cellobiose Dulcitol Erythritol Fructose Galactose Glucose Glycerol Glycogen Inulin Lactose Maltose Mannitol Mannose Melezitose Melibiose Raffinose Rhamnose Salicin Sorbitol Sucrose Trehalose Xylose G + C ratio of the DNA (mol %) - - - - ND ND + + ND ND ND - + ND ND ND - V - + + - ND - - + - ND ND + + ND ND ND - + + + ND ND - V - + + - ND - - + + - ND ND + + ND ND + ND ND ND ND - - + + ND - ND - - + - - + + + - + - - + + + - - - + - - + - 57- (slow) (slow) -59 ND ND ND - ND ND ND - V - ND ND - - - ND ND ND - - ND - V - ND 56 ^ Based on Griffin et al. (1953a), Schubert (1967a, b, 1974), McCarthy (1977a, 1980), Austin et al. (1989) and Pavan et al. (2000). V = Variable result ND = Not done.
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Characteristics of the pathogens: Gram-negative bacteria 89 insofar as there are variations among pigmented strains in the quantity of compound produced and of the time needed for its appearance (Home, 1928; Mackie and Menzies, 1938). In addition, non-pigmented variants may arise (Wiklund et al, 1993), particularly upon subculture (Duff and Stewart, 1933; Evelyn, 1971a). It has also been observed that other Aeromonas species, namely Aer. hydrophila and Aer. media, may produce such pigments when grown on media containing tryptone (see Paterson, 1974; Allen et ai, 1983a). Obviously, this questions the rehability of using pigment production as a differential characteristic. To further complicate the issue, the existence of achromogenic or slowly pigmenting strains of Aer. salmonicida have been described. Another intriguing trait of Aer. salmonicida is the ability to dissociate into different colony types, i.e. rough, smooth and G-phase (intermediate) colonies. This phenomenon was extensively studied by Duff (1937), and will be discussed further in connection with its relevance to pathogenicity (see Chapter 9). Electron microscopy demonstrated that "rough" and "smooth" forms were attributed to the presence or absence of an extracellular layer (= the A-layer), respectively. The notion of homogeneity could be dispelled by the results of PFGE of 44 isolates o^ Aer. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, which generated 30 different profiles and 40 distinct types (Chomarat et al., 1998). However, numerical analysis using the SD coefficient revealed that all the isolates were genomically related (Chomarat et al., 1998). Yet, using 17 typical, 39 atypical and three type strains, RAPD and PFGE analyses suggested heterogeneity across all the strains—notably atypical isolates—but confirmed that typical Aer. salmonicida (including the type strain of Aer. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida)
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  • Bacteria, representative, gram-negative bacteria

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