An important consideration when determining training

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An important consideration when determining training frequency and the implications of SRA on this is how to adjust your training when moving into a Peaking Phase. Peaking is unique from Hypertrophy and Strength, in that due to the higher intensity loads, neural fatigue will be very prominent which means that overloading sessions cannot be as frequent BUT since technical prowess is among the primary goals of a peaking phase and Technical SRA is very short compared to Neural SRA, we have a problem to solve. The solution to that problem is the Technical Session. A Technical Session will provide the opportunity for technical practice in the competition lifts performed at a low enough intensity to actually help decay fatigue through improved blood flow.
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Typically, reducing your number of overloading sessions by 1 from your Strength Phase and replacing that with a Technical Session is appropriate. So if you had been squat- ting 3x/week during a Strength Phase, now during Peaking you would have 2 Overloading sessions and 1 Technical Session. The Technical Session should be anywhere from 10-50% lighter than an Overloading session, the bigger, stronger and more advanced an athlete, the greater re- duction in intensity is appropriate. As an athlete becomes more advanced and experienced, they are able to get good technical practice from very light weights because they are more in tune with very subtle changes in the lift. If you have an athlete who can squat 225# and has been training for 1 year, it is very unlikely that they would be able to notice small shifts in their bodyweight forward or backward or change in knee position with even 75% of their 1rm (170#). While a very experienced lifter who squats 700# and has been lifting for 15 years should be adept enough to notice technical faults in their own lifting even at 315# (45% of 1rm). All lifters should strive to focus on the details of their lifts at light weights so they can move toward this skill and be able to get more quality work out of less load.
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Determining Frequency In addition to the Individual Differences we must consider when determining the frequency, you must also take into account Time, Special Work Capacity and Phase. Time is the first consideration because while we can design the most scientifically sound program possible, it will never work if the athlete isn’t able to adhere to it. When an athlete’s training time is limited to only short training sessions, more frequent sessions, which are less overloading by nature, may be necessary. If the athlete’s time is limited in how many days per microcycle they may train, they will need bigger sessions to satisfy overload and train with their optimal frequency (or close to it). An athlete’s Special Work Capacity is their ability to perform more training in a given session, so while we may find that based on the athlete’s MRV and Optimal Frequency, they should be performing 8-10 overloading sets in a session, they may lack the Special Work Capacity to complete this much work, so they’ll need to spread their Weekly Volume out over more sessions.
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