Class_05_(130117)_P1100

Subjectivist fallacy consists in thinking that

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subjectivist fallacy consists in thinking that something is true necessarily because someone thinks it is true. It also applies whenever objective standards of analysis are ignored in favor of suggesting that one can believe whatever they like. More Dirty Tricks & Not Playing Fair
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25 One particular dangerous type of the “argument from outrage” is scape-goating – blaming a certain group of people or a single person (“illegal aliens” -- notice the dysphemism, Bill Clinton, George Bush, President Obama.) See Limbaugh quote in the text. (p.184) Scape-goating sends us on a “witch hunt” looking for “who to blame” rather than to determine what is reasonable to believe or how to solve the problem. Don’t Let ‘em Not Play Fair Want more advanced stuff on topic? Click here
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26 Trying to scare people into doing something or accepting a position is using scare tactics. • Democrats claimed in the last Presidential election that George Bush was using 9/11 and terrorism as a scare tactic. • Both Democrats and Republicans claim that the other side is using scare tactics on the issue of Social Security. Don’t Let ‘em Not Play Fair
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27 Many current controversial issues are very prone to the use of scare tactics, e.g. same- sex marriage, global warming, abortion, failing banks, and on and on. How can you tell the difference between a “scare tactic” and when a good reason to believe happens to be “scary?” Question for the class: Was the “financial crisis” last fall used as scare tactics to push emergency legislation that would not have otherwise passed? Don’t Let ‘em Not Play Fair
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28 The “argument from pity” and the “argument from envy” are also fallacies. Whatever feelings one has for a victim of some situation or injustice is not in itself an argument for a claim although it can well be a justification for behavior on our part, including increasing our passion to search out and champion a logical argument for a position that will benefit the individual. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06qgaJ2A3Zs
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29 Apple polishing occurs when an appeal to our pride is made by a proponent of a claim. “Come on, relax. Have a beer. Don’t worry about your parents. The one thing I like most about you is that you think for yourself and don’t let your parents tell you what to do. A guilt trip occurs when an appeal to our shame in taking an opposite position is made. Video
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30 The Top Ten Fallacies of All Time (according to your author) G roup Think R ed Herring “Argument” From O utrage “Argument” from P opularity Post Hoc, E rgo Propter Hoc S traw Man J ump to Conclusion A d Hominem Argument W ishful Thinking S care Tactic “GROPES JAWS” BREAKING NEWS! Hominy Strawman outrageously steals jumpsuits, grouping reds with popular pinks.
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subjectivist fallacy consists in thinking that something is...

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