Slide14_2010Fall_MGMT324

Introduced friendly serve enabling mobil to improve

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introduced “Friendly Serve”, enabling Mobil to improve customer loyalty and increase prices Road Warriors True Blues Generation F3 Homebodies Price Driven Generally higher income middle-aged men who drive 25,000 to 50,000 miles a year; buy premium with a credit card; purchase sandwiches and drinks from the convenience store; will sometimes wash their cars at the car wash Usually men and women with moderate to high incomes who are loyal to a brand and sometimes to a particular station; frequently buy premium gasoline and pay in cash (for Fuel, Food, and Fast); Upwardly mobile men and women—half under 25 years of age— who are constantly on the go; drive a lot and snack heavily from the convenience store Usually housewives who shuttle their children around during the day and use whatever gasoline station is based in town or along their route of travel Generally aren’t loyal to either a brand or a station and rarely buy the premium line; frequently on tight budgets; efforts to woo them have been the basis of marketing strategies for years
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Benefit Segmentation Example: Toothpaste One research study in late 60s uncovered 4 main segments Sensory Seeking flavor and product appearance Sociables Seeking brightness of teeth Worriers Seeking decay prevention Independent Seeking low price intsM&feature=related
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Determining a Frame of Reference Objective Marketers need to know Who the target consumer is To establish the ideal points-of-parity and points-of- difference associations (POPs & PODs) vis-à-vis the competition Who the main competitors are How the brand is similar to these competitors How the brand is different from them Criteria for effective segmentation + Competition The selection of target market often defines competition Don’t define competition too narrowly
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Target Market Often Part of Positioning
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Points-Of-Parity (POPs) and Points-Of-Difference (PODs) Points-of-parity associations (POPs)
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