May 5 2006 in 1862 the favorite wife of kamehameha

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, May 5, 2006 (In 1862, the “favorite wife” of Kamehameha the Great, Kaahumanu, informally adopted a Native Hawaiian infant, Mary Nauepu, who eventually married Charles Lucas; when Mary Lucas died in 1965 at the age of 103, she left 4,000 acres of land to her descendants . . . in a trust that many people call the Lucas Estate; that trust currently owns about 1,000 acres on Kauai, most of it near the Ka Loko Reservoir, which burst on March 14, 2006, killing seven people); Harold Nedd, Son Sues Father, Uncle in Fight Over Lucas Estate, P ACIFIC B USINESS N EW s, Mar. 19, 2007 (this story is mostly about the Charlotte Cassiday Trust but involves land in Hawai‘i Loa Ridge, Niu Valley, and Niu Beach, that Charlotte received from her mother Mary Lucas, who had received it from her grandfather sea captain, Alexander Adams, who had received it from Kamehameha I). 76 The five tracts of undeveloped land ranged from 21 to 1,073 acres and totaled 2,035 acres. See id ; see also Tom Finnegan, Pflueger Drives Wide Emotions on Kauai , H ONOLULU S TAR -B ULLETIN , March 26, 2006. 77 See Malia Zimmerman, supra note 73.
After watching a movie, my wife will sometimes ask, “How do you think the story will end?”
16 So here’s my question for readers of this essay: What will Matt King do during the seven years following the end of the movie, to prevent the land from being developed? While considering the possibilities, one must keep in mind that the land in the movie is supposedly worth half a billion dollars. 78 If it were not for that inconvenient fact, Matt might be able to arrange for an organization like the Trust for Public Land, Nature Conservancy or Office of Hawaiian Affairs to buy it at market value. 79 Also keep in mind that distribution of the land to the cousins now or in seven years could be problematic if beneficiaries receive undivided interests in the entire property or full ownership of carved-out portions of the property: If Matt distributes undivided interests, any one co-owner could veto the idea of any other co-owner, no matter how many of the co-owners liked it. Accordingly, the cousins would almost certainly end up in a costly and highly inefficient partition lawsuit, and the land would end up in the hands of a developer defeating Matt’s reason for not selling now. If instead, Matt first carved the tract into separate parcels for distribution to the cousins, he would probably thereby reduce the total market value significantly (i.e., breaking a large tract of developable land in Hawaii into relatively small pieces tends to reduce the land’s total value for development purposes). If the land in the movie could not be developed because of land-use laws, it might actually increase total value by breaking it up into smaller parcels but it

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