Liver transplantation may give chronically infected patients a chance for a

Liver transplantation may give chronically infected

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Liver transplantation may give chronicallyinfected patients a chance for a more nor-mal life. The actual treatment each patientreceives will be determined by his or herresponse to the disease or combination ofdiseases.When assessing your patient, be alert forsigns of activity intolerance, nutrition imbal-ance, anxiety, fear, deficient knowledgeabout hepatitis, and risk for infection andinjury.Take these steps to help your patient withhepatitis prevent complications: Advise him to avoid medications thataffect the liver, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or high doses of ac-etaminophen. Teach him which signs and symptomscould indicate a new infection. Ensure that the patient knows how toOne is neverenough: Usetwo forms ofbirth controlwith certaintherapies.
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July/August 2004 Nursing made Incredibly Easy!31maintain his fluid and electrolyte balancesand record his daily weight.During hospitalization, monitor the fre-quency and quality of the patient’s stooland teach him to do this himself at home.Encourage him to take rest periods asneeded throughout the day.Refer patients with substance abuseproblems to appropriate supportive orga-nizations, such as Alcoholics Anonymousand Narcotics Anonymous.Provide information about the Ameri-can Liver Foundation, (foundation.org), which can help him un-derstand hepatitis and how to live withthe liver damage that has occurred. New treatments and methods of detectinghepatitis viruses are under investigation.Because of the high risk of exposure, youand your fellow health care providersshould be given available vaccines againsthepatitis and follow standard precautions toavoid contact with these pathogens. Learn more about itCenters for Disease Control and Prevention, National Cen-ter for Infectious Diseases: “Viral Hepatitis,” .cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/hepatitis; accessed April 29, 2004.“Hepatitis G Coinfection May Slow Progression from HIVto AIDS,” Clinical Infectious Diseases. 36(7):1, April 2003.Kelly, D., and Skidmore, S.: “Hepatitis C-Z: Recent Ad-vances,” Archives of Disease in Childhood. 85(5):339, May2002.Ruiz-Extremera, A., et al.: “Follow-up of Transmission ofHepatitis C to Babies of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Women: The Role of Breast-Feeding in Transmis-sion,” Journal of Pediatric Disease Transmission. 19:511-516,June 2000.Russell, J., and Godek, B.: ”Adult Immunizations: Under-used in Primary Care,” Patient Care. 37(7):53, July 2003.Zuckerman, M.: “Risk Posed by Discarded Needles andSyringes,” Hepatitis Weekly.October 6, 2003: p 10.CE TestThe ABCs—and more—of hepatitisInstructions• Read the article beginning on page 22.• Take the test, recording your answers in the test answerssection (Section B) of the CE enrollment form on page 43. Eachquestion has only one correct answer.
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