Week 7 CheckPoint_Introductions and Conclusions Writepoint

Baun 1986 showed that exercisers in a tenneco fitness

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Baun (1986) showed that exercisers in a Tenneco fitness program had $553 lower health care costs per person compared to non-exercisers. Gettman (1986) found that physically active employees at Mesa Petroleum Co. spent $217 per person less on medical claims and had 21 hours per person less of sick time than sedentary employees.
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Eating Healthy 8 Describing an Army staff project, Karch (1988) noted that participants who logged the most hours of exercise had the greatest decrease in the number of health services used. Tsai et al. [Move the period to follow the citation] (1988) showed that injury rates and costs associated with injuries decrease as physical activity levels increase. Shore et al. [Move the period to follow the citation] (1989) reported that back fitness improved in municipal workers after six months of exercising and that injury-related absences dropped 0.25 day while [Clearer writing suggestion--"While" is accurate in linking simultaneous events (in the sense of "during")--otherwise use "although," "whereas," "and," or "but"] nonparticipant absences increased 3.1 days. Shephard (1992) reported a zero increase in medical costs for a company with a fitness program and a 35% increase in medical costs for a company with no fitness program. Connors (1992) reported that GE Aircraft employees who were [Clearer writing suggestion-- see if the sentence can be rewritten to remove "that were" or "who were"] members of the fitness center for three years lowered their average annual health care costs from $1044 to $757 per individual. In contrast, nonmembers increased their average annual health care costs from $773 to $941 per person. It has been established [Passive voice] that physical inactivity increases the risk for several health problems and diseases (Blair et al., 1992). In conclusion, logic tells us that [Possible error--If this word refers to a human being, people are never "that" or "which," they are "who"] if a person is inactive (sedentary) and
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Eating Healthy 9 develops more health problems than an active person, the sedentary, unhealthy, or diseased person is going to [Wordiness: These words mean simply "will"] spend more dollars on health care than the healthy, active person. Therefore, physical activity that leads to healthier living will be economically beneficial because fewer dollars will be spent on health problems. . References Baun, W.B., Bernacki, E.J., & Tsai, S.P. (1986). A preliminary investigation: Effect of a corporate fitness program on absenteeism and health care cost. Journal of Occupational Medicine, 28, 18–22. Blair, S.N., Kohl, H.W., III, Gordon, N.F., & Paffenbarger, Jr., R.S. (1992). How much physical activity is good for health? Annual Review of Public Health, 13, 99–126. Cady, L.D. (1985). Programs for increasing health and physical fitness of firefighters. Journal of Occupational Medicine, 27, 110–114. Connors, N. (1992, March). Wellness promotes healthier employees. Business & Health, 66–71.
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Eating Healthy 10 fitness.gov (2010, April 1). Retrieved April 1, 2010, from Gettman, L.R. (1986). Cost-benefit analysis of a corporate fitness program. Fitness in Business, 1, 11–17.
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