Transcultural Health Care A Culturally Competent Approach 3rd Edition

Transcultural health care a culturally competent

This preview shows page 8 - 16 out of 37 pages.

Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Communications Continued Tell stories rather than being blunt and to the point in conversations leading to politeness and sometimes disguised as modesty Hierarchical relationships dictate politeness and social communication resulting in a public self and a personal self
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Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Communications Continued Family affairs remain within the family Self-control is valued and therefore do not show anger or emotions Men can show affection for men and women for women in public, but not men and women Stand close in conversations, regardless of social status between conversants
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Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Communications Continued Maintain intense eye contact between intimates, but avoid eye contact with superiors and elders Expressive gesturing Balance in temporality Clock time is meaningless, even with appointments unless well acculturated
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Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Communications Continued Formality in addressing each other unless close friends More traditional men do not mention their wives’ names in public Man should wait for woman to extend her hand for a greeting
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Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Family Roles Society is patriarchal and hierarchical Oldest son takes over if father is not present or unable to carry out decision-making Male children are more desirable than female children—true in other cultures as well
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Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Family Roles Continued Men deal with finance and matters outside the home. Women care for the home and children. Before 1960s social reform, women were legally expected to be obedient and submissive to their husbands.
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Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Family Roles Continued Marry early and have children. New law says women cannot marry until age 14—was 12 and marriages may still be arranged, but less so in the United States Respect elders and never speak rudely to them Children rarely left with babysitters
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Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Transcultural Health Care: A Culturally Competent Approach, 3rd Edition Family Roles Continued Traditional do not allow dating; women are expected to remain virgins until married, but not men Strong intergenerational ties and family life together or nearby May dress conservatively outside the home but less so while at home
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