The 24 hour advance vessel manifest rule 1 the 24

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The 24-hour Advance Vessel Manifest Rule 1. The 24-hour Advance Vessel Manifest Rule was introduced by the CBP in December 2002 following the passage of the Trade Act of 2002. 8 The Trade Act of 2002 (Section 343) required the CBP to promulgate regulations providing for electronic transmission to customs of information pertaining to cargo destined for and from the United States prior to arrival or departure of such cargo. Some of these requirements were further modified by the passage of the Maritime Port Security Act of 2002. 2. The 24-hour rule, as first published in the Federal Register on 8 August 2002, requires that the vessel's cargo declaration (form 1302 or its electronic equivalent), including 14 specific mandatory informational elements, must be notified to the CBP 24 hours before the cargo is loaded in a foreign port, and that the data be provided in electronic form. 9 This rule is effective since December 2002, and applies both to CSI and non-CSI ports. The mandatory specific information is shown in Box III.1. The new data requirements brought by the 24-hour rule to the cargo declaration include the last foreign port before the vessel departs for the United States; in addition, the data element "Place of Receipt" became mandatory for all carriers. Also, information on the shipper, consignee, and products must now be provided in more detail. 3. According to a CBP press release, CBP reviewed more than 2.4 million bills of lading in the period 2 February to 29 April 2003. 10 About 260 containers with inadequate cargo descriptions were denied loading for violation of the 24-hour rule. Most of these violations were resolved in time for the shipment to make its planned voyage. Effective 4 May 2003, CBP started to issue "Do Not Load" messages for any containerized cargo with invalid or incomplete cargo description. Until then, enforcement efforts had focused only on significant violations of the cargo description requirements. CBP also issues monetary penalties for late submission of cargo declarations: carriers may be assessed a US$5,000 penalty for first violation and US$10,000 for any subsequent violation. 4. The 24-hour rule also applies to cargo passing through the United States that is not destined to be unloaded in a U.S. port; U.S. seaports will also have the authority to issue monetary penalties for foreign cargo remaining on board (FROB) that does not conform to the Rule upon arrival in the United States. 11 Non-vessel-operating common carriers (NVOCCs) may also be assessed damages. (c) The Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism and other security initiatives 1. The Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT), which was launched in May 2002, is a joint government/business initiative to strengthen security throughout the overall supply chain and at the border. Under this programme, businesses undertake to conduct comprehensive self-assessments of their supply chain using the security guidelines developed jointly with the CBP, and they must familiarize companies in their supply chain with the guidelines and the programme.
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