Treaty of Alliance a treaty in which both France and America agreed that if

Treaty of alliance a treaty in which both france and

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Treaty of Alliance – a treaty in which both France and America agreed that if France entered the war, both countries would fight until American independence was won, and neither would conclude a “truce or peace” with Great Britain without “the formal consent of the other” and each would guarantee the other’s possessions in America “from present time and forever against all other powers” Valley Forge – (1777-78) American military encampment near Philadelphia, where more than 3,500 soldiers deserted or died from cold and hunger in the winter Baron von Stuben – “energetic, heavyset, short-legged Prussian soldier of fortune”, he volunteered without rank or pay to basically whip the Continental Army into shape. He used an interpreter and frequent profanity
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as he taught the Americans how to march, shoot, and attack in formation. He was an accomplished drill master. He also taught them about hygiene within their camps Marquis de Lafayete – red-haired French soldier, a wealthy idealist, excited about the American cause who agreed to serve for no pay in exchange for being named a general. He became Washington’s most trusted aide, a courageous soldier, and an able diplomat. George Rogers Clark – a brave young solider who led patriot frontiersman in a battle against the British and Native Americans. He and his men killed five Indians in sight of a British fort, to stop the British and Natives from raiding farm settlements and scalping the frontiers people. Daniel Boone - American frontiersman and legendary hero who helped blaze a trail through Cumberland Gap, a notch in the Appalachian Mountains near the juncture of Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky. He also led settlers to hold off an assault by more than 400 Indians. He was dangerous to the British because he didn’t follow their rules and knew the land very well. Andrew Pickens – led Carolina militiamen to burn dozens of Cherokee villages just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains, after the Cherokee attacked frontier settlements in Virginia and the Carolinas. General Sir Henry Clinton – commander of British forces in America, strategized to take the ports of the south and knock them out that way. He enlisted support from local loyalists and Cherokee. His strategy worked at first, but then the Loyalist strength in the South was less than estimated, the British effort to unleash Indian attacks convinced many undecided backcountry settlers to join the Patriot side, and some British and Loyalist
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