Shallowwaterwaterdepthisabouthalfawavelengthwavebegins

This preview shows page 41 - 44 out of 53 pages.

Shallow water: water depth is about half a wavelength, wave begins to ‘feel bottom’, seal floor drags on wave, so that crests move faster than water belowTranslation WavesShallows slow wave speed, so wavelength becomes shorter and crests height increaseEventually crests become unstable and steep wave front collapsesAs wave breaks forward, turbulent water advances up the shore and forms surfTurbulent advance of water created by breaking waves in shallowsCoastal ZonesOffshore: seaward of where waves break at low tideNearshore: zone between where waves break at low tide to low-tide shorelineWave ErosionCaused by: Wave impact/pressure & Abrasion by rock fragmentsBeachesWaves act to accumulate local sediment along the landward margin of an ocean or lakeBeach FormationAs breaking waves move water up the shore and then back down, sediment is moved and abraded
Finals Study Guide16:41Differential sorting and transport of sediment grains by wind and wave action result in distinct features and zones of the zones of the shore and coastAreas farther inland are affected only by wind transport and occasional storm wavesShore ZonesForeshore: area between low-tide low-water line and high-tide high-water line; most active and wet areaBackshore: area between high-tie shoreline and coastline; affected by storm waves and atypical high tidesForeshore FeaturesLow-Tide Terrace (LTT): flat area exposed only during low tide; composed of fine-grained sedimentBeach Face (BF): wet, sloping surface, lapped by waves only during high tide; slope depends on grain size and wave energy; poorly sorted grainsBackshore FeaturesBerm: flat platform composed of sand and marked by change in slope at seaward edgeBackbeach: landward of berm; composed of generally find-grained/well-sorted sedimentrelative to beach faceCoastal FeaturesDunesHill/ridge of wind-deposited sandChanges in level of the sea relative to land has major impact on the form and features of the coastFalling sea level or a rising current results in emergent coastRising sea level of sinking coast results in submergent coastEmergent CoastsLand once covered by sea emerges to form part of the landscapeCliffs retreat while beach extends at baseFeatures:
Finals Study Guide16:41Jagged cliff faceWave-cut notch, wave-cut platformWhen erosion rates vary, undercutting may initially produce sea cavesWhen sea caves from opposite sides of a rocky headland meet, a sea arch may formEventual weakening of the sea arch may result in its collapse to form a sea stackSubmergent CoastsLand once exposed will be submerged by the seaRiver valley are inundated by ocean water and become estuariesHilly terrains become collections of islandsRising Sea LevelSince 1900, global sea level has risen 1-2mm/yearMany inhabited areas become submergent coasts as it risesCoastal Erosion & DepositionFactors:Degree and type of tectonic activityTopography and composition of the landConfiguration of coastline and nearshorePrevailing wind and weather patterns

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 53 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
DavidPeate
Tags
glacial ice, a Glacier

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture