If we flip the less than signs to greater than signs

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If we flip the less-than signs to greater-than signs, we get three additional scenarios… …but their predictions are identical to those discussed here.
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I. s < q < m m q p’s for which M prefers p to q s S ’s best strategy: propose p q . p loses; q remains law.
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II. q < s < m m q p’s for which M prefers p to q s S ’s best strategy: propose p = s . p wins; the law becomes s .
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III. q < m < s Here, exactly where s falls on the line matters; can you see why? m q p’s for which M prefers p to q | m q| | m q|
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S ’s strategy when she must hold a vote Summarizing: Case S ’s optimal strategy Ultimate law I. s < q < m p q q II. q < s < m p = s s III. q < m < s min( s , m +| m - q | - ε ) min( s , m +| m - q | - ε )
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Question Mayhew: MCs want to get reelected What is the collective action problem in Congress? They’ll do better as a party if they all cooperate to solve national problems But they’ll do better as individuals if they attend to their geographic and political constituencies.
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Where can a bill be stopped? Where can a bill be stopped? What are implications of these veto points?
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Veto Points In a committee Most bills die here Before it reaches the floor Think bill to protect Bob Muller On the floor (House, Senate, Conference, Veto override) By presidential veto
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How has the presidency changed over time?
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Answer It’s become more powerful It’s become the central focus of the nation’s political life It’s become more independent
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Skowronek: Presidential Politics President’s stance toward regime Opposed Affiliated Strength of established regime Vulnerable RECONSTRUCTION DISJUNCTION Resilient PREEMPTION ARTICULATION
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Judiciary – Introduction Is the judiciary undemocratic? Why Marbury v Madison Federalists pass Judiciary Act of 1801 (exploited the lame-duck session) Marshall forgets to deliver signed job commissions on the night before inauguration John Adams installs John Marshall as Chief Justice of Supreme Court D-R’s repeal Judiciary Act in 1802 (Supreme Court agrees that Congress can do this)
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Marbury v Madison William Marbury was one of the Federalists screwed over by Marshall’s forgetfulness and appeals, asking Madison to install the Federalists Madison will likely ignore the Court. Marshall is ruling over a decision fundamentally tied to his mistake. Marshall rules that Marbury has a right to office. But rules that court doesn’t have the right to hear the case, because Congress doesn’t have power to add to Court’s jurisdiction (unconstitutional).
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Marbury v. Madison Key take-aways: 1) Constitution takes precedence 2) Unconstitutional law is void 3) Judiciary is responsible for determining Constitutionality This hurts the Federalists in the short run, but strengthens Judiciary in the long run.
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Courts - Definitions Common law: law developed by judges Stare decisis: a decision made in one case will be followed in the next Textualism: a theory of statutory interpretation that holds that a
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