Although the new GRE allows you to move around within a section and come back

Although the new gre allows you to move around within

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Although the new GRE allows you to move around within a section and come back to questions you previously left blank or wish to reconsider, keep in mind that, if you don't know the words, you won't do any better by attempting the question twice —you'll only waste time and lower your overall score. If you don't know the words, do not leave the question blank . Make your best guess and move on. Don't waste time coming back—spend that extra time on Reading Comprehension or other vocabulary questions that you are able to answer more effectively. In sum: learn the words! Why It Is Important to Learn Words in Context Educational Testing Service tells you not only to check that the two answers you select for a question create sentences that mean the same thing, but also to make sure that each one “produces a sentence that is logically, grammatically, and stylistically coherent.” Hmm. Asking test-takers to check that the completed sentences are “grammatically coherent” implies that some of the choices will create sentences that are not. Here's an example: Education advocates argued that the free school lunch program was vital to creating a school environment _____________ to learning. conducive inimical substantial appropriate beneficial hostile “Education advocates” are certainly in favor of learning; your fill-in might be something like helpful .
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Looking at the choices, conducive , appropriate , and beneficial all seem to be matches. However, if you place each word into the sentence, one choice creates an incorrect idiom. “Conducive to ” works, and “beneficial to ,” but “appropriate to learning” is not a correct idiom—instead, you would say “appropriate for learning.” Thus, it is important not only to memorize dictionary definitions of words, but also to be able to use those words in context, in a grammatically correct way. Here's another example: He's a _____________ fellow, always grandstanding and deploying his formidable lexicon for oratorical effect. declamatory grandiloquent didactic florid titanic cabalistic The target is “he” and the clue is “grandstanding and deploying his formidable lexicon for oratorical effect”; that is, he speaks in a pompous way, as though showing off his vocabulary for an audience. The word florid seems appropriate—it means “flowery” and often applies to speech, as in “florid poetry.” But wait! Florid applies to writing, speech, decor, etc.—not the people who produce those things! (Actually, you can apply florid to people, but in that context it means “flushed, ruddy,” as in having rosy cheeks, which is not appropriate here.) The answer is declamatory and grandiloquent , both of which describe pompous orators (that is, people who make speeches) or the speech of such people. Memorizing that florid means “flowery” is better than nothing, but doesn't really tell you what kinds of things to describe with that word, or how to use it metaphorically.
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