Dickinson utilizes rhythm to unify the poem smoothing

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Dickinson utilizes rhythm to unify the poem, smoothing over the transitions in structure, which makes it easier for the reader to follow. Take her use of parallelism for example, in lines 3 and 4 “Invisible as Music / But positive as sound” and again in lines 9 and 10 “To guess it, puzzles scholars / To gain it, Men have borne…” it makes up for the lack of definitive sentences, connecting certain lines in the poem. She also uses a simple 7 to 6 syllable pattern to unify the piece as she changes structure and tone. The alliteration like beckon and baffles keep the readers engaged. These tools lend to the readability of the poem, guiding the reader through Dickinson’s logic. Just like the structure of the poem helped Dickinson organize her thoughts, the rhythm helps the reader follow along with her. Each literary device used in “This World is not Conclusion” adds a layer of clarity to the poem. The figurative language elucidates complicated ideas, turning abstract ideas into understandable metaphors. The structure collects those ideas and puts them in a logical order that is easy to follow. The rhythm of the poem acts like glue to hold together the transitions in structure to make a cohesive poem.
Works Cited Barnet, Sylvan. "This World Is Not Conclusion." Literature for Composition: Essays, Fiction, Poetry, and Drama . 10th ed. New York: Longman, 2000. 554-55. Print.

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