extent that ontology does not make any sense if it does not change its tune and

Extent that ontology does not make any sense if it

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extent that ontology does not make any sense if it does not change its tune and turn to the description of "lived existence"-rather than insisting in portraying and revealing the meaning and destiny of Spirit." Non-existential ontology appears in this light not only inadequate to spell out the specificity of imperial, colonial, and civilized contexts, but also extremely conservative, if not even oppressive, as it, in its blindness, tends to mask or hide the significance of the existential tensions and the power relations that operate in empire and in contexts with imperial traces , It is for this reason that, for Fanon, beyond a "science of being" we must engage in a science of the relations between being and non-being, describing 116
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d7676e998b256f4a19109bb96464446c30c8d0ff.docx DDI 2013 1 how the exclusion from being is performed and how non-beingness is lived or experienced." This "science" -sociogeny-is deeply connected with a philosophy whose "bracketing" of the universal and attention to the contingent (in terms of what cannot be assimilated into the totality and also in terms of what is produced as contingent by the totality) manifests a strong relation with love, Attention to the contingent is a response to the cry of the condemned, Such attention defines a peculiar attitude, which I will refer to here as the de-colonial attitude, The de-colonial attitude, different from the natural racist attitude of an anti-black and colonial world and from the theoretical attitude that often serves to justify it, mobilizes de-colonial theory and critique as well as a phenomenological investigation characterized by the use of the de-colonial reduction, Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks can thus be read as a unique contribution to discourses on philosophy, critical theory, and "reduction." A2: Cede the Political Our epistemic focus is key to political engagement Mignolo 1 [Walter, with L. Elena Delgado and Rolando J. Robero “Local Histories and Global Designs: An Interview with Walter Mignolo” Discourse , 22.3, Fall 2000, pp. 7–33] Am I diluting the political problems and practices that the theory itself was attempting to address? I do not think so. We cannot , in my opinion, think of the “border” as an object of study from a “territorial” epistemology, not infected by the border. A dilution would be to think that a different political effectiveness could be achieved by changing the content and not the terms of the conversation. Changing the content only would , of course, allow for certain victories , say, in Proposition 127 or other similar social conflicts. This is the level of reform, which of course shall remain open. But my argument moves , simultaneously, toward a complementary end: that of transformation, of changing the terms, and not only the content, of the conversation. The political and the ethical are at this point in need of a new epistemology, epistemologies that come from the borders and from the perspectives of subaltern coloniality . And one final note: the border epistemologies I amclaiming are not intended to “replace” the existing ones. It won’t happen like that even if we want it to. Existing macro-narratives
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  • Fall '16
  • jane smith
  • World War II, Americas, creole elites

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