D compute the following financial ratios for each

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d. Compute the following financial ratios for each year for both firm: (i) Debt-to-Equity Ratio = Total Liabilities/Total Stockholder Equity; (ii) Return on Assets (ROA) = Net Income/Total Assets; and (iii) Return on Equity (ROE) = Net Income/Total Stockholder Equity.
e. Discuss differences between the two firms’ financial ratios and whether you can identify any trends in them over time. What expectations might there be for these findings?
2. Exploring Web site information on mortgage lock-ins (for example, at pueblo.gsa.gov/cic-text/housing/lockinsand other Web sources), explain the purpose of a mortgage lock-in and who it is supposed to benefit. List the advantages and potential disadvantages of lock-ins for the home mortgage borrower.Answer: Refer to All About Lock-Ins22-14
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Chapter 22 - The Residential Mortgage MarketIn most cases, the terms you are quoted when you shop among lenders only represent the terms available to borrowers settling their loan agreement at the time of the quote. The quoted terms may not be the terms available to you at settlement weeks or even months later. Therefore, you should not rely on the terms quoted to you when shopping for a loan unless a lender is willing to offer a lock-in. What Is a Lock-In?A lock-in, also called a rate-lock or rate commitment, is a lender’s promise to hold a certain interest rate and a certain number of points for you, usually for a specified period of time, while your loan application is processed. (Points are additional charges imposed by the lender that are usually prepaid by the consumer at settlement but can sometimes be financed by adding them to the mortgage amount. One point equals one percent of the loan amount.) Depending upon the lender, you may be able to lock in the interest rate and number of points that you will be charged when you file your application, during processing of the loan, when the loan is approved, or later. A lock-in that is given when you apply for a loan may be useful because it’s likely to take your lender several weeks or longer to prepare, document, and evaluate your loan application. During that time, the cost of mortgages may change. But if your interest rate and points are locked in, you should be protected against increases while your application is processed. This protection could affect whether you can afford the mortgage. However, a locked-in rate could also prevent you from taking advantage of price decreases, unless your lender is willing to lock in a lower rate that becomes available during this period.

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