Yet most powerfully there was the conch the being

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“... yet most powerfully, there was the conch. The being that had blown that, had sat waiting for them on the platform with the delicate thing balanced on his knees, was set apart.” (Page 21) The conch appears throughout the novel frequently, and symbolizes a sense of governmental order. The powerful conch is initially why many of the boys vote Ralph the leader, instead of Jack, and then shapes all of their meetings. In the early meetings, when there is still peace among the boys, the conch determines who can speak and creates respectful and productive meetings. Later, when Jack begins to take power the conch begins to become something that he mocks and denounces for its stupidity.
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‘This head is for the beast. It’s a gift.” (Page 124) The pig head on a stake is the “Lord of the Flies,” because of the way that the flies all gather around the spilled guts and nastiness of the pig head. Jack and his tribe say that the head is a sacrifice for the beast, however in reality they are only killing to satisfy their own cravings for blood. This image of their Lord later ‘speaks’ to Simon, telling him the truths of human nature. speaks to Simon.
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Setting and significance: The significance of the setting in The Lord of the Flies is that it takes the boys outside of society and places them in a paradise. Through this they are extracted from the flawed society and allow the author to assert such flaws as violence and intolerance. The isolation of the island forces the boys to create a civilization of their own and uses what they have acquired from life at home to survive. Significance of the opening scene: The opening scene introduces the readers to the setting of the deserted island and to Ralph and Piggy. The reader learns of the personalities of these two influential characters and foreshadows how they will play a key role in the novel after the opening scene. Significance of the closing scene: The closing scene is where Ralph reflects on his experience on the island and he is horrified by the loss of innocence and savageness that rose among the boys. Even though Ralph was saved, the story leaves the reader with an unhappy realization that the savageness of these young boys is seen in our world through history and the savageness continues to exist. Literary Device Quote Simile “The coral was scribbled in the sea as though a giant had bent down to reproduce the shape of the island in a flowing chalk line but tired before he had finished,” (p.29). This simile gives detail to the scenery of the area and allows the reader to get an idea of where they are at the beginning of the book. Personification When the sow takes the form of a real human and speaks to Simon on the stake. The pigs head is not literally talking but it is given a voice to emphasize that the evil is not a single entity but us actually inside each of the boys. Foreshadowing “But you can feel as if you’re not hunting, but —being hunted, as if somethings behind you all the time in the jungle,” (p.53). Alliteration “A series of short sharp cries,” (p.199). Metaphor The sun in the west was a drop of burning gold that slid nearer and nearer the sill of the world,” (p. 43). Possible themes: -loss of innocence -Civilization v. Savagery -Hunger for power -Fear can lead humans to do deadly deeds -Being a leader can be a challenge
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