Inconsistent follow through with recommended care 4

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 8 pages.

3. Inconsistent follow-through with recommended care, 4. Poor grooming, inadequate weight gain, 5. Needle punctures, thrombosed veins, cellulitis, 6. Defensive or hostile reactions, 7 anger or apathy regarding pregnancy, 8. Severe mood swings Birth of an Infant with Congenital Anomalies Factors influencing emotional responses of parents Timing and manner of being told Prior knowledge of defect Type of defect Irreparable defect
Image of page 2

Subscribe to view the full document.

Grief and mourning Nursing considerations Point out the healthy things (“she has your eyes”) Support groups Case Study -Ms. Tucker and her husband have experienced a “perfect” planned pregnancy. Ms. Tucker is a 28- year-old G1P1 who began prenatal care at 8 weeks of gestation. Her labs have been normal, screening ultrasound revealed no anomalies, and her total pregnancy weight gain was 37 lbs. She was admitted last evening at 2300 and at 0700 you assume care of the family. She is complete and “laboring down” with an epidural. -At 0908 she gives birth to an infant boy with Apgar of 9/9. The baby is placed directly on Ms. Tucker’s abdomen and she and her husband begin to meet their son. While counting his fingers and toes, Mr. Tucker notices something unusual about the shape of the baby’s lower legs and asks the physician to look. The physician notes that he will have to have the pediatrician take a look, but it looks like the baby has clubfeet. Mr. Tucker becomes angry and yells, “We had an ultrasound and you all said everything looked perfect. How could this happen?” -What should you do and say? o Help calm the family. o Acknowledge Mr. Tucker’s concern. o Let the couple know that the baby is very stable, and you will notify the pediatric provider to come and evaluate the baby and provide them with more information about their son’s condition. o Try to bring the focus back to what is normal about the baby. Encourage skin to skin contact, bonding, and first latch at the breast. o Notify fellow staff members of the possible anomaly and the family’s concern . -The pediatrician confirms that the infant has bilateral clubfeet and asks an orthopedist to see the baby for immediate intervention. What are the nursing considerations during the postpartum period? o Ask the couple if they would like you to remain with them during the consultation. You can help by maintaining an atmosphere that encourages them to express their feelings and ask questions. o Help them to recognize that it is normal and healthy for them to grieve the loss of the “perfect” infant they expected. o Be sure that the couple understands that this outcome is not their fault. o Promoting bonding and attachment: Emphasize the normal aspects of the baby’s body and communicate acceptance of the infant.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4
  • Spring '14
  • CatherineA.Smart
  • Nursing

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern