George Orwell author of 1984 branches out even more from the premise of Percys

George orwell author of 1984 branches out even more

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George Orwell, author of 1984, branches out even more from the premise of Percy’s thoughts. Within this novel, an omnipotent governmental system, otherwise known as the Party, controls every aspect of every individual’s lives. This involves manipulating ideas and experiences so that reality becomes nothing more than a blurred vision. The Party is able to infuse structured thoughts into the population’s minds, giving them the preconceived ideas that this is what happened to them, how they should feel, and what they should do about it. Because there are no records of what they have, are, and will be experiencing, people are believed to expect what the Party engraves in their brains. Hence, knowledge becomes a precious item that requires authoritative dictation.” “Power is in tearing human minds to pieces and putting them together again in new shapes of your own choosing…the best books are those that tell you what you know already” (Orwell 234). Orwell obviously found the foundation of slight manipulation to have great effects on a person’s actions, emotions, and thoughts. Though Percy did not believe
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to this extremity, both authors can agree on the unsettling concept that a simple implication or censoring can distort reality. The performed complex, according to Percy and Orwell, acts as a puppeteer, moving their toys in an unwavering, intentional manner. “Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own” (Coelho 16). Paulo Coelho, author of the Alchemist, suggests that everyone tries to create specific feeling attached to specific situation, but understands that these generalities cannot be absolute. In his novel, Coelho writes of a young boy who decides to choose his own path of becoming a shepherd rather than becoming a priest, though this is the norm in his village. The boy follows his own interests of travelling the world, and as a result, wasable to find love, experience adventure, and learn his own way of becoming successful. Along his journey, the boy is taught that negative experiences are only negative if one fools oneself intothinking it is, and truth for the opposite as well. Unlike Coelho, Percy tries to formulate a generality of certain feelings chained to certain experiences. For example, while Coelho would argue that leaving a loved one to go find help is a feeling that can be sad yet hopeful, Percy would only associate its true essence as an experience of despair. The couple driving from Guanajuato to Mexico City mentioned in “The Loss of the Creature” is thought to be “missing something” from the “interesting and picturesque Taxco and Cuernavaca”, “falling short of ‘it’” (Percy 754). Who is Percy to determine that every touristy location is a place where true essence is lost? How is Percy to judge what they thought of Taxco and Cuernavaca? The mere thought that Percy is generalizing a feeling with a tourist location shatters his entire argument of pre-formulation. Not every experience must be as great as the Grand Canyon to be considered significant. The only reason why Percy chose the Canyon as an example is because his view has
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