separate over time if left alone An example of a suspension is a mixture of

Separate over time if left alone an example of a

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separate over time _________ if left alone. An example of a suspension is a mixture of ____ water and sand _____. When mixed up, the sand will ______ disperse throughout _________ the water. If left alone, the sand will ____________ settle to the bottom _________. Colloids (heterogeneous) A colloid is a mixture where ______ very small particles of one substance are evenly distributed throughout another substance ________. They appear very similar to _____ solutions ________, but the particles are ______ suspended in the solution __________ rather than ________ fully dissolved ___________. The difference between a colloid and a suspension is _________ the particles will not settle to the bottom over a period of time ______, they will stay suspended or float. An example of a colloid is ______ milk ___________. Milk is a mixture of ______ liquid butterfat globules dispersed _______and_____ suspended _____in water. Part 5: Separating Mixtures ? Module=../Grade5/Chapter7-SeparatingMixtures/ Watch the video above and describe 4-5 different ways mixtures can be separated. 1. Filtration 2. Floatation 3. solubility 4. Magnetism Part 6: Practice Separating Mixtures You need to decide how you would separate the following mixtures. Use tools you know of to help you. Complete the chart on the computer and below use the link below to get some separation ideas: - Mixtures-CHEM/?referrer=concept_details
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Mixture Separation Mechanism Physical Properties that Allow Separation 1. Sand and Iron Filings Magnetism - The iron filings are magnetic so it is easier to separate 2. Salad Filtration - You can take out the different compartments of the salad by just separating them 3. Salt and Water Evaporation - When the water evaporates, it would leave behind the salt. Water can be evaporated. 4. Muddy Water Distillation - When the water is heated, it would phase change into a gas then condense back into a pure liquid, leaving the mud behind. 5. Dust in Air I’m not sure :(
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