More sites on history of the burning candle demonstration Here is an online

More sites on history of the burning candle

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More sites on history of the burning candle demonstration Here is an online source of the original Faraday book The Chemical History of a Candle : . The Gutenberg Project also has a text- only version available here: . More sites on the burning candle demonstration The Journal of Chemical Education published an article in their January 2008 issue entitled “ A Bright Spark: Open Teaching of Science Using Faraday’s Lectures on Candles”. It details how the three authors used Faraday’s candle lectures to prepare an original inquiry-based lesson on candle burning. The lesson proceeds through a series of questions posed by the teacher that eventually take students through most of the experiments Faraday did in his lecture series. (Walker, M.; Groger, M.; Schluter, K. A Bright Spark: Open Teaching of Science Using Faraday’s Lectures on Candles. J. Chem. Educ. , 2008 , 85 (1), p 59, ) (abstract only—full pdf document available online only by subscription) 51
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This 13-page document, “Candles under Jars”, provides a very detailed explanation of all of the problems associated with the burning candle demonstration: . More sites on the greenhouse effect demonstration Here’s another site for the “Climate Change 101” (4:33) video clip of the Bill Nye greenhouse gas experiment discussed previously in this Teacher’s Guide: . This site contains lots of information about the greenhouse effect. It provides several charts showing how solar energy enters and leaves our Earth system. ( ) And this site, , shows us many misconceptions we have about the greenhouse effect. And note, he pulls no punches! More sites on electrostatic deflection of liquids demonstration Here’s a 0:15 video clip showing the deflection of water by a glass rod. Charging is optional (must have been done off-screen). ( ? v=w8Z7HuA07to&feature=player_embedded ) This 4:12 video clip from Flinn Scientific features Irwin Talesnick, from Queen’s University, Ontario, CA. Presenting this demonstration to teachers, he discusses the difference between polar and nonpolar molecules and uses two burets with water and toluene to show deflection with water and no deflection with toluene. He shows that both negative and positive rods attract water. As these videos from Flinn are meant to be teaching tools, he offers no explanations. ( ) This 2:08 video clip from Frostbite Theater (“Cold Cuts … No baloney, just science!”) from the Office of Science Education at the Jefferson Lab National Accelerator provides a great (albeit incorrect ) explanation of the deflected water stream, based on the rotating of the polar water molecule such that the end of the molecule that moves toward the charged rod is the oppositely charged side. ( -
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