interviewees perceived a range of obstacles to CSER practice in Bangladesh

Interviewees perceived a range of obstacles to cser

This preview shows page 21 - 22 out of 30 pages.

interviewees perceived a range of obstacles to CSER practice in Bangladesh, which has implications for managers in developing CSER strategy. Like many other developing countries where CSER is an emerging concept, organisations in Bangladesh have only just commenced their journey. Managers can identify barriers and take action accordingly to enhance CSER and meet stakeholder concerns, and this may require further stakeholder engagement with all levels of stakeholders to increase coordination of CSER initiatives and awareness. For example, partnership with NGOs can enhance corporate image. The central argument of this study is that there is a range of issues that directly and indirectly restrict CSER practices. More specifically, the study identifies barriers to CSER, such as corruption and politics, lack of monitoring, government initiatives and regulations, and establishes stakeholders’ views about CSER practices in Bangladesh. The study also argues that various stakeholders’ initiatives and responsible roles (e.g. collective work of NGOs, media, civil society, regulators, etc.) can have a positive influence on CSER development. This study has some limitations. Generalisation of findings is always problematic as perceptions of stakeholder groups vary between countries. This qualitative study forms a basis for future research on CSER practice and can be validated through further empirical testing in different developing country contexts. Future research exploring barriers to CSER from a wider and more diverse stakeholder perspective may underpin further research into CSER in both developed and developing countries. Future studies may also consider the role of different stakeholders group to improve CSER practices in Bangladesh. References Acutt, N.J. and Medina-Ross, V. (2004), “Perspectives on corporate social responsibility in the chemical sector: a comparative analysis of the Mexican and South African cases”, Natural Resources Forum , Vol. 28 No. 4, pp. 302-316. Adams, C.A. (2002), “Internal organisational factors influencing corporate social and ethical reporting: beyond current theorising”, Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal , Vol. 15 No. 2, pp. 223-303. Adams, C.A. and Frost, G.R. (2006), “The internet and change in corporate stakeholder engagement and communication strategies on social and environmental performance”, Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change , Vol. 2 No. 3, pp. 281-303. Adams, C.A. and Kuasirikun, N. (2000), “A comparative analysis of corporate reporting on ethical issues by UK and German chemical and pharmaceutical companies”, European Accounting Review , Vol. 9 No. 1, pp. 53-80. Aminuzzaman, S.M. (2010), “Environment policy of Bangladesh: a case study of an ambitious policy with implementation snag”, paper presented at South Asia Climate Change Forum, Monash Sustainability Institute, Monash University, Melbourne, 5-9 July.
Image of page 21
Image of page 22

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 30 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture