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The customer service in box when victoria and her

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years is directly attributed to these courtesy calls. The Customer Service “In-Box” When Victoria and her team walked into the customer service department, they first wanted to know how many orders for boxes of products were waiting to be processed. These orders would represent the “raw materials” for this business process. They looked at the e-mail in-box and the website in-box and counted orders totaling 430 boxes of products that had not yet been viewed by either customer service representative. Order Printing and Verification The first task of a customer service representative is to create paper copies of the customer orders, so e-mailed and web orders are first printed and then checked to make sure that all the appropriate information has been provided by the customer. If there is any missing information, the customer service representative contacts the customer to obtain that information. Because each customer service representative prints new customer orders once a day, on average, each of them enters half of the customer orders in a batch before sending the orders to the next step in the process. The value stream mapping team watches a customer service representative print paper copies of the orders for 20 minutes. In that time, 8 orders representing 64 boxes were
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printed. Victoria calculated the Processing Time to be 18.75 seconds [20 minutes x 60 seconds / 64 boxes]. Realizing that each customer service representative only spends a portion of their time printing customer orders, when calculating the Cycle Time for this step of the process, Victoria used a Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of 1 person [2 people x (4 hours/8 hours)]. After printing each order and verifying that the information is correct on all the printed orders, these orders are sent by interoffice mail to the Order Entry operators. Victoria asked one of the customer service representatives how often they had to contact a customer for missing information. The employee told Victoria that since CWI had instituted web- based orders, missing information is rarely a problem. The last time that a representative needed to call a customer to obtain additional information was over 8 months ago. Victoria and her team noticed that there were orders for 290 boxes that had been printed and verified as they walked through the Customer Service Department. Transportation to Order Entry The customer service representatives are located near the Sales Department so that customer issues can be resolved quickly. The order entry operators are located in another building, where the computer mainframe is located to eliminate the expense of running network cables between the two buildings. Because the interoffice mail delivery person delivers mail once a day, on average, it takes ½ day for printed orders to arrive at the order entry station. Order Entry Two people have been hired full time to enter customer orders into the Customer Order Database. At the beginning of the day, they take containers of printed orders into the order entry room and throughout the day enter these containers of orders into the Customer Order Database. Each container holds orders that represent approximately 580 boxes. After entering the information into the database, they print a hard-copy of the order from the Customer Order Database, staple it to the original order and place it back in the container. At the end of the day, they place the containers of completely entered orders in interoffice mail to be sent back to the Customer Service Department for a final check. After Victoria watched one of these order entry
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