Flosi and his men set fire to the hall but they offer safe passage to the women

Flosi and his men set fire to the hall but they offer

This preview shows page 3 - 4 out of 4 pages.

himself when he has a vision of the destruction of the hall. Flosi and his men set fire to the hall, but they offer safe passage to the women, children, and Njal. Njal stays inside, and his son Helgi is beheaded when he tries to escape dressed as a woman. Kari Solmundarson escapes in the smoke. Flosi goes all-out enlisting support to prepare for the Althing, because he knows his case will be difficult to defend. Njal, his wife Bergthora, and Kari's young son Thord are found
Image of page 3
unburned in the hall and are given Christian death rites. Flosi bribes Eyolf Bolverksson, one of the three greatest lawyers in Iceland, with a gold bracelet to join his side. In Icelandic law, lawyers cannot be paid to pursue a case. Mord has been forced to prosecute from the Njalssons' side alongside Njal's other foster-son, Thorhall. At the proceedings, Eyjolf and Flosi are losing until they pull a trick: they have secretly changed Flosi's residence and legal associations so that the case is invalidated through jurisdiction technicalities. Thorhall takes them to the Fifth Court immediately. Once again, Eyjolf gets Flosi out on another manipulated technical detail, this time with the number of jurors allowed to judge the case. Thorhall, who has been operating from a distant tent due to an infected leg wound, tears the infection out of his own leg and marches to Law Rock with his weapon at the ready. He kills the first person he sees, and an outright battle follows. This is the first time Law Rock has ever seen blood. Hall of Sida tries to initiate a peaceful settlement by having a renowned godi create an arbitration panel of 12 to determine the punishments. Flosi is sent on a three-year exile, and the rest of the men involved in the burning are exiled for life. Initially, Kari Solmundarson and Thorgier Craggeir, the men who are pursuing Njal's settlement, refuse the settlement. Thorgeir accepts the settlement once they have killed five of the burners through ambush. Kari, however, cannot allow his young son's death to go unavenged. He asks that Thorgeir allow him to work alone, because he does not want Thorgeir to be harmed in any way. He takes Bjorn the White, a comic-relief character, as a sidekick for a while, and manages to kill 13 more burners. He kills two more through pursuit in distant lands. The Battle of Clontarf, or Brian's battle, is fought outside Dublin on Good Friday 1014 between Christian King Brian and heathen forces led by Earl Sigtrygg of Dublin. Earl Sigurd of Orkney dies on the heathen side, along with 15 more burners. Brian dies, but the heathens are defeated. Then, the Song of Dorrud, a long poem of 11 stanzas, tells of Dorrud, a man who witnesses the weaving of a bloody web by twelve valkyries through a window. Lastly, Flosi pilgrimages to Rome. Kari does so as well. Flosi then returns to farm at Svinafell. Kari, on the other hand, shipwrecks at Ingolfshofdi on his way back to Iceland. When the two parties meet at Svinafell, they reconcile. Kari, who is now a widower of Helga Njalsdottir, marries Flosi's niece Hildigunn, whose first husband, Hoskuld Thrainsson, had fallen under the blows of the Njalssons and Kari.
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 4 pages?

  • Fall '19
  • Gunnar, Njal

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture