muriaticum Selected Nonprescription Pediculicidesand Alternative Therapies

Muriaticum selected nonprescription pediculicidesand

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muriaticum Selected Nonprescription Pediculicidesand Alternative Therapies (Table 37-4)
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Acne Chapter 38
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Acne, also known as acne vulgaris (AV), is an inflammatory skin disease that affects 40 50 million people in the United States Lesions most commonly found on the face, but also found on the back, chest, lower back, shoulders and arms, and neck Most prevalent during adolescence Acne is the result of several pathologic processes that occur within the pilosebaceous unit located in the dermis , or middle layer of the skin Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Acne
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Multifactorial Diet Gender Genetics Many exacerbating factors Etiology of Acne
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Factor Description of Factor Acne cosmetica Noninflammatory comedones on the face, chin, and cheek caused by occlusion of the pilosebaceous unit by oil-based cosmetics, moisturizers, pomades, or other health and beauty products Acne excoriee (excoriated) A form of acne caused by constant picking, squeezing, or scratching at the skin, which causes the acne to look worse Acne mechanica Local irritation or friction from occlusive clothing, headbands, helmets, or other friction-producing devices Excessive contact between face and hands, such as resting the chin or cheek on the hand Chloracne An acneiform eruption caused by exposure to chlorine compounds Drug-induced acne More common: Anabolic steroids, bromides, corticosteroids, corticotrophin, isoniazid, lithium, phenytoin Exacerbating Factors in Acne (Table 38-1)
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Factor Description of Factor Drug-induced acne Less common: Azathioprine; cyclosporine; disulfiram; phenobarbital; quinidine; tetracycline; vitamins B 1 , B 6 , B 12 , and D 2 Hormone-induced acne Hormonal alterations, specifically increased androgen levels induced by medical conditions, pregnancy, or medications Hydration-induced acne Hydration-induced decrease in size of pilosebaceous duct orifice and prevention of loosening of comedone caused by high-humidity environments and prolonged sweating Occupational acne Exposure to dirt, vaporized cooking oils, or certain industrial chemicals, such as coal tar and petroleum derivatives Stress- and extreme emotion induced acne May induce expression of neuroendocrine modulators and release of CRH, which play a role in centrally and topically induced stress of the sebaceous glands and possibly progression of acne Exacerbating Factors in Acne (Table 38-1)
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Non-inflammatory lesions: open or closed comedones Inflammatory lesions: papules, pustules, or nodules Severity: defined by the number and type of acne lesions Clinical Presentation of Acne Mild Moderate Severe Few erythematous papules and occasional pustules mixed with comedones Many erythematous papules and pustules and prominent scarring Extensive pustules, erythematous papules, and multiple nodules in an inflamed background
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Moderate-to-severe acne Exacerbating factors (e.g., comedogenic drugs, mechanical irritation) Possible rosacea Exclusions for Self-Treatment of Acne
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Treatment goals: identify any exacerbating factors of acne,
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  • Fall '13
  • Head louse, Pediculosis, Body louse, acne, Acneiform eruptions

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