Her hardest hue rich alliteration and a hint of personification as Mother

Her hardest hue rich alliteration and a hint of

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Her hardest hue - rich alliteration and a hint of personification as (Mother) Nature struggles to keep hold of this new fresh gold. Time is against her as the season begins to unfurl and with it the leaves, changing color all too quickly. A repeat of 'Her' to remind the reader of the cyclic process. The leaf now transforms into a flower, that is, it represents the transient state of life, fleeting existence. Add a little hyperbole - the season is reduced to about one hour! That is some short life span. The poet is saying that time passes so fast; blink an eye and it's gone. Lines 5 - 8 Again there is the focus on the leaf, each deciduous tree's budding acknowledgement of the return of spring. Each leaf becomes less active as time wears on; they fade away as sure as the temperature starts to drop and the days become shorter. Subsides is an interesting word to use in this context - its root is from the Latin subsidere which means to settle or sink.
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Line six brings with it the relation to the human condition, specifically the old testament Garden of Eden, where Adam and Eve's lives fell into shame because of their disobedience. The parallels are clear - perfect, ideal situations don't last forever. Paradise falls, and innocence or beauty doesn’t last forever. This poem has strong leanings on death and the fleetingness of life, the temporality of life. Dawn will always be a temporary state, it will slide away into day as surely as day will slide into night and so on and so forth. Precious 'golden' times and states, by their very nature, are destined to change into something that may not always be ideal, so the message is to take full advantage of what is precious and valuable. When You Are Old Analysis: This is a poem that many see as highlighting the unrequited love between the speaker, presumably Yeats, and his former lover. The speaker, talking directly to his muse, instructs her to open the book in which this poem can be found and to re-read it. While re-reading, she should recall how many people loved her for both true and false reasons, namely because of her beauty. The speaker goes on to tell the lover that there was one man, probably the speaker, who loved her completely. In the final stanza, the speaker tells his former lover that she should remember that this love did not last, and she should be filled with regret because of it. The poem is comprised of three stanzas, each containing four lines. The rhyme scheme is very distinct and steady; the first stanza is a b b a ; the second is c d d c ; the third is e f f e . Additionally, Yeats wrote the poem in iambic pentameter. This, coupled with the steady rhyme scheme, lends a sing-song quality to the poem. While the work is relatively short, like any Yeats poem, it is jam-packed with imagery and other poetic devices. The first stanza opens the poem, revealing that our speaker is talking directly to his former lover. The first line reads: “When you are old and grey and full of sleep…” From this line, the reader can derive that he is writing this while his lover is still relatively young, but she should read this again when she is an old woman. The speaker has very specific instructions for his lover. Not only should she read the poem when
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  • Spring '19
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  • Poetry, Stanza, Robert Hayden

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