If you stall out and can no longer make progress or you need a change of pace

If you stall out and can no longer make progress or

This preview shows page 67 - 70 out of 79 pages.

. If you stall out and can no longer make progress, or you need a change of pace after completing the original program, move on to a different Minimalist Workout Routine or use the Program Extenders on page 72. Now let’s look at the very importantworkout notes you need for the Move More, Rest Less program.
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68 Move More, Rest Less Routine Workout Notes I highly recommend reading these notes before every workout for the first couple of weeks to ensure you do everything correctly. Perform 1-4 warm-up sets for each exercise.Exercises that allow you to use more weight (e.g. deadlifts) will take more warm-up sets than exercises that use less weight (e.g. standing one arm dumbbell press). For each subsequent warm-up set, increase the weight while decreasing the reps performed. Here’s an example assuming a work weight of 155 pounds: oWarm-up set #1 95 x 8 (95 pounds, 8 reps) oWarm-up set #2 115 x 5 oWarm-up set #3 135 x 3 The purpose of the warm-up sets is to prepare you for the work sets. Do as many warm-up sets as needed to achieve that goal without accumulating too much fatigue. This may take a bit of trial and error, but it’s not complicated. You may find you prefer more or fewer warm-up sets. Just do what works best for you. Make every rep count.Don’t rush a set just to get it over with. Put 100 percent focus and effort into each and every rep you perform, from the first to the very last. Remember: quality is important here. Every workout consists of a single circuit. Perform each exercise, one after another, until you complete the prescribed number of circuits. How long should you rest between exercises and circuits?This where this routine stands apart from the others in this e-book. You’ll see“rest as needed between exercises and circuits” in each workout. You can make the goal of each workout to move as quickly as possible, and over time strive to decrease the rest periods. Or, if you prefer, you can have a specified rest period to begin with and every time you repeat the workout, decrease the rest period. Let’s say, for example, you begin by resting 60 seconds between each exercise and circuit. Each time you repeat the workout decrease the rest period by five seconds. With that example, the first time you perform the workout rest 60 seconds, the second time rest 55 seconds, the third time rest 50 seconds, and the fourth time rest 45 seconds. You can even progress all the way down to 15 seconds or less between each exercise and circuit.
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69 This is a great way to improve your performance in each workout without adding additional weight. It also means your workouts will gradually take less time to complete, since you’re doing the same amount of work in less time.After a few workouts you can add more weight to each exercise and begin again with higher rest periods of 60 seconds or so, then each workout decrease the rest periods by five seconds once again, but this time with the heavier weight.
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  • Spring '19
  • Cannavale
  • Nutrition, Physical exercise, Minimalism Guidelines

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