An example of a metaphor is alex is a chicken

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An example of a metaphor is “Alex is a chicken”. Literally, this sounds so very absurd. But this is a metaphor which suggests that Alex is a coward, or frightened. It compares or implies that Alex is a chicken to bring out the symbolism. Some other examples are ‘love is a battlefield”, “all the world’s a stage”, “that technology is a dinosaur” etc. While a simile and metaphor seem to be very similar, there is one basic difference between the two. In a simile, the comparison happens with the help of the words “as” and “like”. A metaphor will not have either of those two words. 3] Personification Another very interesting figure of speech is personification. In this, we personify or represent a non-human entity as human. We give an inanimate object or an intangible idea of some human qualities such as emotions, or gestures or even speech. this is done to portray the object as alive and help the listener or reader paint a vivid picture. Again, if we take the words at their literal meaning they will sound absurd. “The wind howled as the storm grew stronger”. Here we have taken an object, the wind, and personified it as a living thing by claiming it howled. Other such examples could be, “time ran away from him”, “the boat danced in the puddle”, “the car died in the middle of the road” etc. 4] Hyperbole Hyperbole in the Greek language translates to ‘excess’. And that is what it does, it exaggerates. We use hyperboles to emphasize the importance
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or the overstate something. This exaggerates claims and statements are never meant to be taken at their literal meaning. They are used to create a strong and lasting impression An example would be “Since he has been away from home he has gotten as thin as a toothpick “. Obviously, he has not gotten as thin as a toothpick, we only exaggerate to emphasize on how thin he has become. Some other examples are, “Those shoes cost a king’s ransom”, “For the millionth time, clean the kitchen”, “his grandfather is older than the hills”. 5] Onomatopeia This is a figure of speech where words or phrases indicate sounds. Often to bring about more imagery and better describe a setting, authors use words to involve all five of our senses. Onomatopeia refers to those words that imitate the sounds of an object or person. For example “The bees buzzed around in the garden”. Here the word ‘buzzed’ is indicating the sound coming from the bees. Some other examples are “the leaves were rustling”, “the door was squeaking”, “he closed the book with a thud” etc.
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