Some of these heaters will require a 220 volt line

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electrician. Some of these heaters will require a 220-volt line coming in and that can be dangerous both during wiring and also during operation if wired incorrectly. Second, is there is a higher initial cost to purchase a water heater for each outlet. However, the greater energy efficiency that this delivers will allow less solar panels to be purchased which will hopefully offset the cost of the hot water heaters. In the house we are converting there are two full bathrooms with a shower and a sink, a kitchen sink and dishwasher, and a washing machine and “slop” sink. To help lower the cost some of these items will run off of the same hot water heaters. The washing machine and slop sink are next to each other, and both rarely if ever use hot water, and they are right under the dishwasher and kitchen sink. Therefore, all four of these outlets will run off of one hot water heater. Also, the two bathroom sinks run off of the same water line so they will also run off of one hot water heater. Lastly, each shower will have its own hot water heater. That means that this project will require four hot water heaters. The flow rate for a typical bathroom faucet is around 1.0 gpm, gallons per minute, while both kitchen sinks and showers typically use approximately 2.2 gpm (Alliance for Water Efficiency, n.d.). Based on these flow rates, the hot water heater that would supply the two bathroom sinks would cost $139 and the heater for the other three sinks would cost $149. This would bring the total to approximately $586 and after speaking to a local electrician, he gave a rough estimate that it will cost between $500-$600 to wire. Therefore, the total for this conversion should be no more than $1,200.
COMPLETELY CONVERTING TO SOLAR POWER 13 The heating system is a little more complicated since there are multiple directions that you could go for heating. However, while doing this home conversion the use of a heat pump is going to be the direction that we go. This is because the heat pump “becomes a key component in an energy recovery system with great potential for energy saving.” (Chua, K., Chou, S., & Yang, 2010). The difficulty with this is that the systems can be a bit costly and need to be installed by a professional with specialized tools and knowledge of what they are doing. However, a large benefit to these systems is that they can be used to both heat the home in the winter and cool it in the summer. The average price for a full heat pump system plus installation is around $5,700 plus four handler units, at around $500 each, putting the overall cost after installation at approximately $7,700. A final expense that is not going to be considered at this point but should still be discussed is the removal of old equipment. There is an oil burner in the basement as well as the baseboard heaters and piping for the heaters that run throughout the house. Since there is water in them they should not be left indefinitely because there is always the potential for a pipe to leak. However, these are not an immediate concern and will most likely be removed as each room gets updated in the next five to ten years.

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