Correct Diagnosis The current diagnosis for the figure two is cherry angiomas

Correct diagnosis the current diagnosis for the

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Correct Diagnosis: The current diagnosis for the figure two is cherry angiomas. There are red moles, which are common skin growths that can develop on most areas of the skin. They are also known as senile angiomas or Campbell de Morgan spots. (Delgado, 2017). The collections of small blood vessels inside the cherry angiomas give the spot the reddish appearance. Cherry angiomas are the most common cutaneous vascular proliferations. They are often widespread and appear as tiny cherry-red papules or macules. Longstanding lesions enlarge slowly over time and take on the appearance of a dome topped with cherry-red to deep-purple papules. (Brown, 2016). References Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2015). Seidel's guide to physical examination (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby. Brown, C. W., (2016). Cherry Hemangioma . Retrieved from Delgado, A. (2017). What are cherry angiomas ? Retrieved from Sullivan, D. D. (2012). Guide to clinical documentation (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis. Comprehensive SOAP Template Figure Five
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Patient Initials: _Unidentified Age: _Unidentified Gender: _Unidentified SUBJECTIVE DATA : No subjective data information given about the patient with the skin condition in figure five. Chief Complaint (CC): No chief complaint information given about the patient with the skin condition in figure five. History of Present Illness (HPI): There is no patient’s identification such as age, sex, marital status given about this patient. However, the skin looks that of an older Caucasian patient. There is also no information about onset of symptoms, location, duration, character, aggravating factors, relieving factors, treatment, or severity. The skin appears to be of a Caucasian complexion with pink, dry, scaly, and leathery patches. Medications: Not stated. Allergies: Not stated. Past Medical History (PMH): Not stated Past Surgical History (PSH): Not stated Sexual/Reproductive History: Not stated. Personal/Social History: Not stated. Immunization History: Not stated. Significant Family History: Not stated.
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Lifestyle: Not stated. Review of Systems: An inventory of specific body systems designed to document any symptoms the patient may be experiencing or has experienced. Typically, both positive and negative symptoms are documented. (Sullivan, 2012). General: No information about the general well-being such as weight loss, weight gain, fatigue, weakness, fever, chills, or night sweats given about the patient figure five. HEENT: Neck: Breasts: Respiratory: Cardiovascular/Peripheral Vascular: Gastrointestinal: Genitourinary: Musculoskeletal: Psychiatric: Neurological:
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Skin: Dry scaly patches on the skin Hematologic: Endocrine: Allergic/Immunologic: OBJECTIVE DATA : These are the findings resulting from direct observation- what you see, hear, or touch. Relate physical findings to the processes of inspection, palpation, auscultation, and percussion, making the clear the process of detection so confusion does not occur. (Ball, Dains, Flynn, Solomon, & Stewart, 2015).
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