The inspection concluded with some positive and negative observations The

The inspection concluded with some positive and

This preview shows page 68 - 69 out of 341 pages.

of Don Bosco's disciples. The inspection concluded with some positive and negative observations. The assistants' cells in the dormitories were too large: there should be neither tables nor shelves, just a place for the clothes, a chair and a trunk, if one could not do without; it would have been better to place the cells amidst the boys' beds. Then there was a need to see that the assistants study together, for example in the library, so the dormitories could remain closed during the day, according to the rule Theology classes were too irregular, also liturgy. The Immaculate Conception Sodality should be started up. The brothers who were doing special studies with Don Bosco's consent had to have more time available, and a guarantee of more regular classes. Other notes regarded the food: in general the community menu should be along the lines of the Oratory in Turin; too much coffee was given out and the cafeteria was available to the personnel, something to be avoided. Fr Rua had an understanding with the Prefect of the house, Fr Fagnano, that all personnel would have laundry marked with their own names, exclusively for their use. The register of income and expenses was well kept, and helped one to know how much money there was. On 26 July 1875, Fr Rua began his inspection of the College at Alassio. The work had been founded in 1870, in agreement with the municipality and was located in an old Franciscan convent. It was an important school, with excellent primary classes and a complete lower and upper secondary section. In 1875-1876 there were 160 boarders, and in 1877 more than 200. Between boarders and day students in 1876-1877, Alassio had 415 pupils. It was entrusted to the wise direction of Francis Cerruti, another first generation Salesian, and one of the most learned. Fr Rua's visit to Alassio was brief and summary His observations were simple: they needed to see that the day students could attend religious functions on Sundays; there were some religious pictures missing from some areas; some of the assistants' cells were too big and should be shifted to the middle of the boys' beds; some classrooms were rather filfthy; if community meditation and spiritual reading were arranged for, it would be easier to see who was not making them; finally there needed to be more insistence on the study of theology. On 11 March 1875, Fr Rua began the visit to the house at Valsalice, on the hill overlooking Turin. In 1871 Don Bosco, at the request of Archbishop Gastaldi, but with serious opposition from the Superior Chapter, had accepted the running of this institution for aristocrats which had found itself in serious financial difficulties. The service personnel weighed heavily on the accounts. In 1872-1873 there were only twenty two boarders. At the time of Fr Rua's visit their number had increased to thirty five. Fr Francis Dalmazzo was in charge, helped by a group of collaborators: a Prefect, Catechist and three Councillors, plus four bother and clerical confreres.
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