Genuinely get students excited about learning and

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genuinely get students excited about learning and often tap into their culture and digital interests”(Maguth, 2013). By getting students excited about learning and incorporating something they arefamiliar with outside of the classroom, students will become more eager to learn. In order to discuss how cellphones should be used in the classroom, there must be clear guidelines on how to use them as educational devices and just not a way to cheat. Teachers and students both have different ideas on what constitutes as what they find useful in using their cellphones. While teachers may view students using their cellphones to submit assignments
helpful, students may view looking up information to complete an assignment more helpful. “Often use their phones to fact-check and it has become increasingly common for students to take pictures of the boards and/or materials” (Berry and Westfall, 2015). Not only does access to taking pictures of notes help students with disabilities, having access to a camera to record can also help students with their disabilities. Due to all of the readily available features a cell phone has, Thomas and Munoz have referred to it as the swiss army knife. With all of the features a phone has to offer, it is a double edge sword for some students. Students can use their internet browser to search for help on a question, and find the have wasted time looking up different articles they found of interest but also has no relevance to what they originally looking up. In order to conduct research, Tessier encouraged students to use cell phones in class. When the semester was completed, Tessier had his students complete a survey to see how students felt about the overall experience on using their phones during his class. The survey revealed students felt their phone usage was not a distraction, they helped improve success in the class, and caused them to enjoy the class even more. Also, in his research, Tessier stated “Few students needed nudges to stay on task with cell phones, because they were highly engaged in the course content”(Tessier, 2013). Due to the increase of ELL students in classrooms, and not all schools having the funds for 1:1 technology cell phone usage seems to be the next logical step in aiding these students academically. Begum cites Kukulska-Hulme (2006) who points out “students are able to access language learning materials, and to communicate with their teachers and peers, at anytime, anywhere.” However, this technology can benefit non-ELL students in the classrooms as well. Students can have access to multiple learning resources to supplement what is already being
taught in the classroom, and they can communicate with teachers when having an issue with a topic they are discussing in class.

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