CONCLUSION From a systematic review of the currently available published

Conclusion from a systematic review of the currently

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CONCLUSION: From a systematic review of the currently available published literature, evidence is lacking for nutrition-related health effects that result from the consumption of organically produced foodstuffs.
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Food Chem Toxicol . 2010 Nov;48(11):3058-66. Consuming organic versus conventional vegetables: the effect on nutrient and contaminant intakes. Hoefkens C The intake of specific nutrients and contaminants was inconsistent (i.e., higher or lower) for organic versus conventional vegetables. When considering the higher vegetable consumption pattern of organic consumers, an increase in intake of a selected set of nutrients and contaminants was observed. In public health terms, there is insufficient evidence to recommend organic over conventional vegetables.
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Ann Intern Med. 2012 Sep 4;157(5):348-66. Are organic foods safer or healthier than conventional alternatives?: a systematic review. Smith-Spangler C CONCLUSION: The published literature lacks strong evidence that organic foods are significantly more nutritious than conventional foods. Consumption of organic foods may reduce exposure to pesticide residues and antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
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Ann Intern M ed. 2013 Feb 19;158(4):296-7. Are organic foods safer or healthier? Benbrook C . This Stanford study came to two major conclusions: The published literature lacks strong evidence that organic foods are significantly more nutritious than conventional foods. Consumption of organic foods may reduce exposure to pesticide residues and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. FYI: Going Organic: What’s the Payoff? (Interview with C. Benbrook – CSPI Newsletter) http://
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N Engl J Med. 2013 Feb 25. Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease with a Mediterranean Diet. Estruch R Conclusions from study: Among persons at high cardiovascular risk, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events by 30%.
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The traditional Mediterranean diet is rich in vegetables, fruits, fish, and olive oil
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The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans include a Healthy Mediterranean-Style Eating Pattern Designed "to more closely reflect eating patterns that have been associated with positive health outcomes in studies of Mediterranean-Style diets." Contains more fruits and seafood and less dairy than the U.S.-Style, and with the exception of calcium and vitamin D, has similar nutrient content. The Guidelines state that "the healthfulness of the Pattern was evaluated based on its similarity to food group intakes reported for groups with positive health outcomes in studies rather than on meeting specified nutrient standards." http ://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/chapter-1/ examples-of-other-healthy-eating-patterns /
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Diets rich in vegetables, fruits, legumes,
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  • Fall '15
  • Nutrition, health benefits, vegetarian diets, plant-based diets

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