Over the next few years Scott wrote and published The Lay of the Lake 1810

Over the next few years scott wrote and published the

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In 1809 Scott decided that John Ballantyne & Company would enter the world of publishing. Over the next few years Scott wrote and published The Lay of the Lake (1810), Rokeby (1813) and The Bridal of Triermain (1813). That year Scott merged his publishing interests with those of his former rival, Archibald Constable . Scott refused the offer of poet laureate in 1813 and recommended Robert Southey for the post. Scott now turned from poetry to the novel. Over the next ten years he anonymously published several novels including Waverly (1814), Guy Mannering (1815), The Antiquary (1816), Rob Roy (1817), The Heart of Midlothian (1818) and Ivanhoe (1819). Walter Scott was created a baronet in 1820. Scott, who had established the form of the historical novel, was an extremely popular writer. However, Scott's publishing ventures went bankrupt in 1826 and Scott found himself liable for a debt of £114,000. Scott worked tirelessly to pay off his creditors and over the next few years wrote Woodstock (1826), The Fair Maid of Perth (1828), Anne of Geierstein (1829) and Count Robert of Paris (1831). Sir Walter Scott suffered his first stroke on 15th February 1830. He retired as principal clerk to the court of session in November with a pension of £864, and soon afterwards suffered a second, damaging stroke. He made a slow recovery but in April 1831 he had a third stroke. He died at Abbotsford on 21st September 1832 Jane Austen Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, England. While not widely known in her own time, Austen's comic novels of love among the landed gentry gained popularity after 1869, and her reputation skyrocketed in the 20th century. Her novels, including Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility , are considered literary classics, bridging the gap between romance and realism. Early Life The seventh child and second daughter of Cassandra and George Austen, Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, England. Jane's parents were well-respected community members. Her father served as the Oxford-educated rector for a nearby Anglican parish. The family was close and the children grew up in an environment that stressed learning and creative thinking. When Jane was young, she and her siblings were encouraged to read from their father's extensive library. The children also authored and put on plays and charades. Over the span of her life, Jane would become especially close to her father and older sister, Cassandra. Indeed, she and Cassandra would one day collaborate on a published work. In order to acquire a more formal education, Jane and Cassandra were sent to boarding schools during Jane's pre-adolescence. During this time, Jane and her sister caught typhus, with Jane nearly succumbing to the illness. After a short period of formal education cut short by financial constraints, they returned home and lived with the family from that time forward.
Literary Works Ever fascinated by the world of stories, Jane began to write in bound notebooks. In the 1790s, during her adolescence, she started to craft her own novels and wrote Love and Freindship [sic], a parody of romantic fiction organized as a series of love letters. Using that framework, she

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