Here interpersonal social influence is a process

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Here interpersonal (social) influence is a process whereby a group of individuals process and weigh information from others given the social context within which the group is operating (Rashotte 2006). This social context represents a form of social structural constraint that guides individuals on how information from others should be processed and weighed in the formulation of their own opinions. Both status characteristics and social identity theories provide formal mechanisms that assist in modeling how information from others is incorporated into an individual’s opinion and therefore how correlated behavior may emerge Briefly it is evident that our feelings, thoughts and perceptions are influenced by the environment in which we live. The environment is compiled of our family, friends, colleagues and co-workers. It has been evidenced that the group members respond in a way that other group member want them to be so if we belong to a social network or group that has strong and positive values we develop positive attitudes and good habbits. Conversely we belong to a group or social network that is mainly negative we do not develop healthy attitudes. 4 Cultural and Gender Influences Culture and gender have been considered to have a strong impact on social behavior. Gender difference and its impact on social behavior has been an important part of social psychology. Where and when gender will have an effect on a person’s performance has been discussed widely in prior research; for instance, ways the labor market opportunity structure affects women’s school performance and subject choices (Baker and Jones, 1993). For example, in the U. S. Bureau report of 2003, females have demonstrated not only a quantitative increase in
numbers of attendees, but also shown as good qualitative academic performance as their male classmates have in school. One theory that I want to discuss in the context of cultural and gender influences is social capital theory. According to structural hole argument of social capital theory, social capital is formed through a network where people can make connections connecting the disconnected segments; which means the individual who becomes the knot to connect two unrelated networks will have the best social capital and get the most information. Hence, to the individual, the best way to manage the social network in new environment may be develop both host network and co-national network; the “bi-cultural network”. Staying in the position that connects a host- network and a co-national network is possibly the way to receive the most resources. Swagler’s study about Taiwanese students in the U.S. has a similar conclusion: in which the general patterns indicated that Taiwanese students who had contact with both Taiwanese and Americans have better adjustment and performance in school (Swagler and Ellis, 2003). Ainsworth’s study about African American students and Tapia’s study about Latinos both pointed out that without

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