employeemayworkforacompetitororsetupacompetingbusinessinwhic...

  • DeAnza College
  • BUS BUS18
  • Test Prep
  • iTaipeh
  • 19
  • 100% (6) 6 out of 6 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 8 - 10 out of 19 pages.

employee may work for a competitor, or set up a competing business, in which the company’s trade secrets will likely be disclosed. 2. Misappropriation of Trade Secrets At common law, a company can sue a firm or an individual that misappropriates its trade secrets. VI. Raising Financial Capital A. L OANS A business can raise capital through a bank loan, a loan from the Small Business Administration, or credit cards. C ASE  S YNOPSIS Case 42.2: InfoSAGE, Inc. v. Mellon Ventures, LP InfoSAGE, Inc., a software development company, was founded in part through funding provided by Mellon   Ventures,   L.P.,   a   venture   capitalist.     Unable   to   procure   additional   financing   as   planned,
CHAPTER 42:  LAW FOR SMALL BUSINESSES          69 InfoSAGE obtained a loan from Mellon. Eventually, InfoSAGE filed for bankruptcy. The firm also filed a suit in a Pennsylvania state court against Mellon, alleging tortious interference with business relations and breach of fiduciary duty in preventing the additional financing from materializing. The court issued a summary judgment in Mellon’s favor. InfoSAGE appealed. A state intermediate appellate court affirmed.  InfoSAGE failed “to establish that its prospective contractual relations with the venture capital firms had progressed to a point showing, or were based on, a reasonable likelihood or probability that these relations would result in a contract.” The firm also failed to show the unjust enrichment required to establish a breach of fiduciary duty. .................................................................................................................................................. Notes and Questions What did InfoSAGE need to show to prove the first element of its claim?   The court found that the company's negotiations with most of the potential investors had not advanced very far. Only one of the potential investors initiated its due diligence process, but even this investor placed a considerably lower value on InfoSAGE than the company did on itself. And, of course, there was no evidence that Mellon had influenced the lower valuation. Besides, the investor could have provided only 20 percent of the financing and only if other contributors provided the first 80 percent, and InfoSAGE had not yet filled out and submitted the form required to apply to the investor's board. Thus, to succeed on its claim, InfoSAGE needed to show that negotiations with at least one of the potential investors had progressed beyond the inquiry stage. InfoSAGE would have to show that forms had been filled out and filed, that one or more of the investors had begun investigating InfoSAGE as an

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture