Contracostatimescom medianews has learned that google

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ContraCostaTimes.com. "MediaNews has learned that Google has quietly licensed the sensing technology developed by a team of Stanford University students that enabled Stanley, a Volkswagon Touareg R5, to win the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge. In that race, the Stanford robotic car successfully drove more than 131 miles through the Mojave Desert in less than seven hours. The technology will enable Google to map out photo-realistic 3-D versions of cities around the world, and possibly regain ground it has lost to Microsoft's 3- D mapping application known as Virtual Earth. ... Sebastian Thrun, director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab and leader of the Stanford Racing Team, will also work part-time at Google." -> <#listtop>back to headlines May 23, 3007: <Citizens Participate in Government Rule-Making. Newswise (source: Cornell University). "At least 160 federal agencies churn out rules and regulations -- more than 4,000 a year -- from specifying the height of steps on buses for the disabled to the method of calculating food's fiber content. Before finalizing a rule, government agencies are required to solicit and consider public comment .... To help the agencies deal with rulemaking in the Internet age and make the process more accessible to the public, Cornell scientists and legal experts have created the Cornell e-Rulemaking Initiative (CeRI) .... The interdisciplinary collaboration involves Cynthia Farina, professor of law; Claire Cardie, professor of computing and information science; Erica Wagner, assistant profess! or of marketing strategy and information technology; and Thoma! s Bruce, director of the Cornell Legal Information Institute. ... Cardie, an expert in natural language processing, is developing computer programs to sift and categorize the masses of comments. First, agency staff will highlight sentences in the comments that connect with various issues. Over time, the computer will learn the rules of classification and take over. 'People can classify all of the phrases and sentences in about 40 to 50 comments per day, depending on length,' Cardie says. 'Software takes just seconds to classify all of the phrases and sentences in one document.'" -> <#listtop>back to headlines May 23, 2007: <- Learning: Just Another Way to Say 'AI.' Jon Erickson's Editor's Eye blog. Dr. Dobb'sPortal. "I try to stay on top of the latest buzzwords in computing. ! Really I do. But no matter how forward thinking I am, it turns out I'm always a little behind the curve. ... And now there's 'self-
learning software.' I don't know about you, but to me that says 'artificial intelligence.' But since no one wants to use the term 'AI' anymore, self-learning software will have to do. ... What brought all this to my attention is IBM's new self-learning software [IBM® Classification Module for OmniFind™ Discovery Edition] that automatically categorizes large volumes of information, making it easier to find, access, and use." -> <#listtop>back to headlines <ALERT hom! e page:

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