Patient Advocacy and Patient Safety Patient advocacy is defined by the nursing

Patient advocacy and patient safety patient advocacy

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 17 pages.

Patient Advocacy and Patient Safety Patient advocacy is defined by the nursing profession as speaking on behalf of the patient on local, state, and national levels promoting safer health care systems for the patient ( Cherry & Jacob, 2014, p. 221). Advocating for patients is a priority in the profession; patients depend on nurses to receive high quality care. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) along with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are two regulatory agencies that impact my nursing practice. The FDA regulates foods, drugs, medical devices, blood products and vaccines making sure they are safe for consumption and use (Agencies & regulations, 2017). The FDA influences my practice by advocating for patients when medications are expired, medical devices are broken or medications are unsafe to give patients. The CMS defines nursing practice by setting guidelines for reimbursement programs, overseeing HIPPAA administrative simplification transaction and patient safety (Agencies & regulations, 2017). CMS has had a major impact on my nursing career by speaking on behalf of a patient that was not being properly cared for and ensuring equal treatment for all patients.
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Professional roles and values project Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are holistic healing practices that are not evidence-base supported. ( Cherry & Jacob, 2014, p. 204). The FDA responds to the use of alternative therapies by stating they must meet the requirements for food and drug (Complementary and alternative medicine, 2017). Alternative therapies are not covered by CMS (Medicare national coverage, 2016). Alternative therapies can be wonderful things, but there is no evidence that proves they are truly safe. Differences and Similarities of Nurse Practice Act The Nurse Practice Act governs nursing practices in conjunction with nurse delegation ( Cherry & Jacob, 2014, p. 349). The Ohio and North Carolina Nurse Practice Act have many similarities in their definitions. Ohio’s Nurse Practice Act states that a nurse who has entered into standard of care must be in continuous communication with physicians (Lawriter – ORC, 2001). North Carolina Nurse Practice Act states collaboration is determined by the health care providers and that it is appropriate for the patient (Nurse practice act state of North Carolina, 2009). Both nurse practice acts focus in on collaboration with all health care providers for the patient’s benefit. One thing different in the two states’ nurse practice act is that North Carolina delegates the nurse as the responsible party for recording and reporting patient findings (Nurse practice act state of North Carolina, 2009) whereas Ohio’s Nurse Practice Act does not define any one party as being responsible for charting. Both nurse practice acts state that when an RN delegates to an UAP (whether it be a compact or a non-compact state), the nurse must know the scope of the UAP practice, that the UAP is competent, that the UAP cannot delegate any nursing tasks, and the nurse must follow through to see that the UAP completed the task correctly ( Cherry & Jacob, 2014, p. 350).
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