Secondary socialization the more specific formal

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Secondary Socialization The more specific formal training that individuals experience throughout their life, such as learning how to drive, learning how to be a parent, or learning an occupation. Role-Taking The process of assuming the perspective of others, or putting ourselves in their position. Generalized Other The perspectives and expectations of a network of others, or of the community as a whole. Cultural Process The common stock of knowledge, skills, images and/or guidelines (rules, standards, thoughts, feelings, outlooks) that helps people fit their ideas of appropriate behavior together in (ambiguous) social situations in order to accomplish a given task. Social Structure Consists of roles and relationships among roles; various dimensions of culture “flesh out” and give meaning to social structure. Role Are empty slots in social space that have behavior shaping situation specific obligations and expectations attached to them, they exert normative force by making us feel obligated to carry pout their demands and by making us feel ashamed or embarrassed when we fall short. Values Diffuse and highly general understandings of what society holds in high esteem. It doesn’t direct our behavior in organizational setting. Norms Specific behavioral prescriptions (do) and proscriptions (don’t) to be implemented in specific situation/roles. Questions to Consider 1. According to Peter Berger, what is the “first wisdom of sociology”? Use a concrete example to illustrate this principle. The first wisdom of sociology is things aren’t what they seem. Media talking about the south side of Chicago is an example because they only focus on the bad neighborhoods and the shootings that happen and everyone thinks its really bad but if they go to Hyde Park, the people would be surprised how many white people live their. 2. According to C.W. Mills, developing a “sociological imagination” requires understanding how a society’s most significant social problems are the result of social “issues” rather than “troubles.” First, define the term “sociological imagination.” Next, distinguish social
“troubles” from social “issues.” Last, use a concrete example to explain how a social problem that at first glance appears to be a “trouble” is, in light of the sociological imagination, actually produced by a social “issue.” Sociological Imagination: enables its possessor to understand the larger historical scene in terms of its meaning for the inner life and the external career of a variety of individuals. It enables him to take into account how individuals, in the welter of their daily experience, often become falsely conscious of their social positions.

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