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Eng 393 Final Project

The average time for the control group was 5 minutes

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successfully complete the maze. The average time for the control group was 5 minutes and the average time for the Mozart group was 1 minute and 30 seconds; but the average time for the heavy metal group was 30 minutes. The project ended up being cut short because the experimenter said, “all the hard-rock mice killed each other…none of the classical mice did that” (Mice and Music Experiment). Another study was completed on fifth-grade children to study the effects of background music during their classwork time. The students were observed for 42 class sessions. The first 15 class session were observed without music, but during sessions 16-30, background music was played and the results in the chart below show that the music had a positive effect on the students’ performance. In the last sessions of the study, the children were observed without music. The results show that the children’s performance dropped, but it is still higher than the sessions without music from the beginning of the study. (Davidson, Charles W. , and Lou Anne Powell). 7
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Results From this research, I have gathered that allowing students to listen to music in school will be beneficial not only to them but to teachers as well. Implementing this change provides health benefits to the students that will improve their performance in school. The music will calm and relax them as well as helping them focus more. From the research I’ve also gathered that there should be guidelines or listening to music so that it will not create even more distractions. Objections Some teachers feel as though allowing students to listen to music in class will distract them even more as well as distract other students. Also, the problem has risen that students shouldn’t be able to use cell phones because that adds to the problem of texting during school, which is completely prohibited. Another issue that teachers have with allowing this practice is that they feel that the music children listen to is negative and they don’t see how it could have a positive effect on the children. The final objection is that we cannot be sure that allowing music in the classroom will positively affect children. Although studies in the past have proven a positive effect, there is no way that we can know it will help all children. Conclusion Though these objections are valid, there are ways to fix them so that children can still listen to music in the classroom. In order to implement this change, there will have to be rules that are put into place so that students don’t take advantage of it. A teacher 8
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named Elona Hartjes has allowed her students to listen to music in her classroom and she has set specific rules that she says the students willingly cooperate with. Her rules are: 1. Students may only listen to music during personal work time; during lectures and group discussions, all music must be put away. 2. Once the student puts his music on, the device must be put away completely out of sight so that the teacher knows the student isn’t using the device for other purposes.
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