Hydration nutrition Injury prevention Reye Syndrome Rapidly progressive

Hydration nutrition injury prevention reye syndrome

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 7 pages.

Hydration, nutrition Injury prevention Reye Syndrome Rapidly progressive encephalopathy (altered brain function) which begins shortly after a viral infection (influenza or varicella – chicken pox) Affects primarily brain (cerebral edema) and liver (fatty changes) Administration of aspirin associated with developmental of Reye’s Syndrome. Early diagnosis is vital. “Laymans” Term So, your liver is a major organ in our body. Liver filters our blood from all of the bad stuff in our blood and it gets out the waste products in our blood. If our body is just skipping over the blood filtering process, and we will have things like ammonia . Having that ammonia in your cerebral spinal fluid and within the brain itself is detrimental. o First of all, it’s alkaline. So, this basic product is in your brain, changing the pH of your brain. o Ammonia fights with potassium for binding spots. So, what potassium normally is doing within your brain allowing the cell walls to work and to fight you properly. The potassium is now fighting for that. So, you have an increase on your potassium within the blood because it’s now attached to the cells within your brain and you have ammonia attached to the cell walls and ammonia is not doing the proper job that potassium would. So, the firing of the neurons becomes less. Stage 1 having the increased amounts of ammonia in the brain causes the signs and symptoms of lethargy , as well as vomiting , Stage 2 , you began to see seizures . Stage 3 , you can see fixed pupils or you will see fixed pupils . But this is really a concerning stage. This is the stage we can start to really fall off a cliff and may go very very fast. Once you hit stage 3, you go to coma and then stage 5 is death. So, having an enlarge vein is very problematic for the pediatric patient. Liver also converts glycogen into glucose and glucose into glycogen. This is how our body uses sugar. And sugar, of course is something that we need to have any sort of ATP anywhere in our body. It gives us energy everywhere. So, we need to have these sugars within our cells. So, if the liver is not co- producing the back and forth between glycogen and glucose, we are going to see hyper and hypoglycemic states within the pediatric child. For the pediatric population, it’s usually hypoglycemic. Liver creates clotting factors , so you’ll want to be checking the PT , PTT labs. You would also check your liver labs which will be ALT and AST – this will be increased. o We want to reduce the effects of having an encephalopathy within that child. So, you’ll want to be giving them a hypertonic solution to try and bring down any sort of extra swelling that we can or any increased intracranial pressure. Assessment (S/S) History of viral illness Progressive neurologic decline Fever Rash (hands and feet)
Image of page 4
Cerebral Notes Vomiting (effortless) Elevated ammonia Respiratory arrest Profound, impaired consciousness Coma Therapeutic Management Supportive care based on the stage Establish and maintain patent airway Assess and treat hypoglycemia Provide rest and decrease stimulation Monitor I&Os
Image of page 5
Image of page 6

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture